National Fisherman

In 1608, John Smith started mapping the Chesapeake Bay. However, it was very different from today's bay; the water was cleaner, the diversity of animals astounding and the landscape dominated by forests and marshes. Huge oyster reefs were plentiful throughout the bay and made navigation for Captain Smith difficult, leading to him remark that the oysters "lay as thick as stones."

Flash forward nearly 400 years and the story is completely different. Oyster populations have been decimated. Overharvesting, diseases and poor water quality have led to a sharp decline in oyster populations. However, there are many dedicated people and organizations encouraging the resurgence of the oyster.

In oyster hatcheries like Horn Point Lab, the future of our oyster population is being born and raised. Mature oysters will release sperm and eggs in a tank. The eggs become fertilized and are then moved to another tank, where they will grow into veligers. The veliger phases are the only phases in an oyster's life cycle where it is at least partially ­mobile.

The oyster will go through several veliger phases before eventually turning into a pediveliger, which has a muscular foot, similar to a clam, which allows it to crawl. At this point, the pediveliger will be placed into a different tank where weathered oyster shells have been placed. The pediveliger will eventually settle onto these old shells and mature into spat on shell.

Once the spat establishes itself, it will no longer be mobile and will start to mature into an adult oyster. The entire process, going from free-floating sperm and egg to settling down and turning into spat on shell, takes anywhere from two to three weeks. Once the spat is established, it can take one to three years for it to turn into a mature oyster capable of reproduction. Mature oysters can live for decades in the right conditions, and during this time they can even switch genders if needed for ­reproduction.

Read the full story at the Ocean Pines Independent>>

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 3/10/15

In this episode, Online Editor Leslie Taylor talks with Mike McLouglin, vice president of Dunlop Industrial and Protective Footwear.

National Fisherman Live: 2/24/15

In this episode:

March date set for disaster aid dispersal
Oregon LNG project could disrupt fishing
NOAA tweaks gear marking requirement
N.C. launches first commercial/recreational dock
Spiny lobster traps limits not well received

Inside the Industry

It is with great sadness that Furuno USA announced the passing of industry veteran and long-time Furuno employee, Ed Davis, on April 30.
Read more...

Alaska Gov. Bill Walker is required by state statute to appoint someone to the Board of Fisheries by today, Tuesday, May 19. However, his efforts to fill the seat have gone unfulfilled since he took office in January. The seven-member board serves as an in-state fishery management council for fisheries in state waters.

The resignation of Walker’s director of Boards and Commissions, Karen Gillis, fanned the flames of controversy late last week.

Read more...
Try a FREE issue of National Fisherman

Fill out this order form, If you like the magazine, get the rest of the year for just $14.95 (12 issues in all). If not, simply write cancel on the bill, return it, and owe nothing.

First Name
Last Name
Address
Country
U.S. Canada Other

City
State/Province
Postal/ Zip Code
Email