National Fisherman

During a visit to Eureka Tuesday, March 26 congressman Jared Huffman announced plans to introduce legislation aimed at alleviating the financial hardship of a federal loan that has been weighing on Pacific Coast groundfish fishermen for just under a decade.

Huffman's Revitalizing the Economy of Fisheries in the Pacific Act picks up where a bipartisan bill introduced in Sept. 2012 by former North Coast congressmen Mike Thompson left off and would allow for the refinancing of a $35.7 million buyback loan authorized by Congress in 2003.

The opportunity to refinance the loan at a lower interest rate would give local groundfish fishermen the same opportunities as any homeowner or business, Huffman said during a news conference to announce the bill held outside the Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center last Tuesday afternoon. The bipartisan bill would not require the federal government to spend any new money.

"It is becoming increasingly difficult for them (fishermen) - especially small businesses - to repay that debt, plus new fees - higher fuel costs, higher health care costs - and to remain in business," he said. "Like any of us, they would like to refinance. They would like to take advantage of these historically low interest rates that we have today, but they need an act of Congress to do that."

A 2003 act of Congress authorized the buyback loan, which Huffman's bill aims to change, as part of a push to address overfishing and help rebuild depleted groundfish fishery stocks along the West Coast. Under the Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishing Capacity Reduction Program, funds were dispersed to fishermen who agreed to surrender fishing privileges for cash payments. In total, 91 vessels and 239 fishing permits were removed from the fishery. The remaining fishermen were tasked with the burden of repaying the buyback loan debt, with interest, at a five percent ex-vessel value - the value before processing - of all fish harvested.

However, for the first 18 months of the loan period - as interest accrued - no mechanism existed for payments to be made on the loan. By the time the first payment could be made, fishermen were facing more than $4 million in interest.

Pete Leipzig, executive director of the Eureka-based Fisherman's Marketing Association, said while implementing the program was a good action at the time - "the people that remained in business enjoyed the benefit of having the same amount of fish, just fewer of the folks fishing for them." He said failing to create a system to allow fishermen to make payments on the loan for so many months resulted in a financial hardship that hasn't diminished over the years.

Read the full story at the Redwood Times>>

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 10/7/14

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