National Fisherman


In case you haven't noticed, our shrimp trawlers are disappearing. They are those wooden boats with the rigging floating out behind, a sea of gulls trailing them as they power out to sea, trawling for white and brown shrimp.

It's getting harder and harder for shrimpers to make a living because they face increasing insurance and gas costs, repairs, regulations and competition from foreign imported shrimp.

What was once a respected way of life on the water is slowly dying, and with it will go one of the icons of Lowcountry life.

That's why Florida photographer John Adams has taken on the project of documenting the trawlers in his project, "Evanescent Trawlers of the South." And he's funding it in a unusual way: He has turned to Kickstarter on the Internet for help with raising money. He is seeking support from communities all along his route, and he's looking for only modest sums.

Read the full story at Post and Courier>>

Inside the Industry

The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation announced last week the sixth round of grant awards from its Fisheries Innovation Fund, a program launched in 2010 to foster innovations that support sustainable fisheries in the United States. 

The goal of the Fisheries Innovation Fund is to sustain fishermen and fishing communities while simultaneously rebuilding fish stocks.

Read more...

Alaskan Leader Fisheries will give Inmarsat’s new high-speed broadband maritime communications service, Fleet Xpress, a try on the 150-foot longline cod catcher/processor Alaskan Leader.

Read more...

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