National Fisherman

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Views on catch shares from some of the nation's oldest and newest programs remain deeply divided

Part 2: West Coast and Alaska


By Melissa Wood

For both a crewman just starting out on deck and an Alaska veteran, one of the problems with catch shares is that they change the nature of what it means to be a fisherman.

Ryan Higby, 29, crews on a trawler out of Kodiak Island in the Gulf of Alaska, where pollock and cod remain under a fleet quota. For him, the inevitability of catch shares coming to that fishery signals a possible end to his fishing career.

"The general sentiment is that it's privatization of what should be an open resource," says Higby. "People think that the fish should go to those willing to go out and get it. No one's behind it; they're expecting and preparing for it."

These days, Chris Berns, 60, also of Kodiak, mostly fishes salmon and some crab. Fishing in Alaska since 1970, Berns doesn't know of any fishery in the state he hasn't participated in at one time or another, including the early days of the halibut and blackcod individual fishing quota program. Catch shares, he says, turn a fisherman into a businessman. "It's kind of counter-intuitive to how fishermen worked," says Berns who points out that previously a fisherman had to be hardy enough to stay up all hours running gear. Now, "you have to have an MBA to be a fisherman."

In Alaska, home of some of the country's oldest catch share programs, industry views are mixed on whether the management system has been a good thing for those fisheries. Those sentiments are shared among U.S. West Coast fishermen, as well. Though there is consensus that programs should be crafted with measures specifically designed for each fishery, rarely does it seem that stakeholders agree on what is best.

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 1/13/15

In this episode:

Council hosts public hearing on Cashes Ledge
Report assesses Chesapeake water, fisheries
Warmer waters shake up Jersey fishing
North Pacific observer program altered for 2015
Woman aims to crowdsource lobstering career

National Fisherman Live: 12/30/14

In this episode, Michael Crowley, National Fisherman's Boats & Gear editor, interviews Chelsea Woodward, an engineer working with the NIOSH Alaska Pacific Office to design static guards for main drum winches used in the side trawl fishery in the Gulf of Mexico.

Inside the Industry

The Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute is still seeking public review and comment on the Alaska Responsible Fisheries Management Conformance Criteria (Version 1.2, September 2011). The public review and comment period, which opened on Dec. 3, 2014, runs through Monday, Feb. 3.

Read more...

NOAA, in consultation with the Department of the Interior, has appointed 10 new members to the Marine Protected Areas Federal Advisory Committee. The 20-member committee is composed of individuals with diverse backgrounds and experience who advise the departments of commerce and the interior on ways to strengthen and connect the nation's MPA programs. The new members join the 10 continuing members appointed in 2012.

Read more...

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