National Fisherman

All in the family

Family is the heart and soul of many American fishing businesses. In working waterfront towns across the country, that family often extends to include the larger community of commercial fishing fleets. What develops is a network that expands to create a safety net and often new opportunities for the fleets and their shore-based counterparts.

The same can certainly be said of a small group of Danish fishing families who saw their way of life being threatened by the onslaught of individual transferable quotas in 2006. As longtime National Fisherman contributor and author of several books on the fishing and seafood industries Paul Molyneaux explores in his story on page 20, the flyshooting fleet of Thorupstrand saw their livelihoods being pulled away by the strong tide of politicized market forces, toward consolidated fleets. Determined not to stick their heads in the sand, this fleet of beach-based seiners and gillnetters formed a quota cooperative to increase their buying power, which has assured the next generation, the so-called "gold of Thorupstrand" their place on the water.

Though closer to home than Denmark, the Great Lakes is often far from many American fishermen's ports and minds. There on Lake Michigan the third and fourth generations of Petersen Fisheries set trap nets for Great Lakes whitefish. Michigan writer Dan Denov has gotten to know the Petersen family on a couple of outings aboard the family-built Petersen Brothers, a 52-foot steel trap net boat that plies the waters of Lake Michigan from the family's dock on nearby Lake Muskegon. Their story begins on page 24.

NF Assistant Editor Melissa Wood took a trip down to Gloucester, Mass., for the opening of the Giacalone family's off-loading facility, a partnership with the founders of the Boston Seafood Display Auction. All four Giacalone boys are working in the auction house, owned by their father, NF Highliner, Gloucester trawling skipper and industry advocate Vito Giacalone Sr. Melissa's story begins on page 26.

A family of another kind can be found far to the north in Atlantic Canada's Prince Edward Island, where the wider community of local wooden boatbuilders shares a history with fishermen on both sides of the border. Boats & Gear Editor Michael Crowley explores the last 100 years of Canadian boatbuilding traditions and how designs were shaped by the needs of inshore fishermen (page 28).

It's not often we have the opportunity to investigate outside of our normal scope of U.S. fishing. But whenever we do, we discover the vast breadth of knowledge that comes from knowing fishermen around the world as well as in our backyard.

-Jessica Hathaway

Inside the Industry

The anti-mining group Salmon Beyond Borders expressed disappointment and dismay last week at Alaska Governor Bill Walker’s announcement that he has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with B.C. Premier Christy Clark.

This came just days after his administration asked members of his newly-formed Transboundary Rivers Citizens Advisory Work Group to provide comment on a Draft Statement of Cooperation associated with Transboundary mining.


NMFS recently released a draft action plan for fish discard and release mortality science, creating a list of actions that they hope can better inform fisheries.

We know that fishermen have to deal with bycatch by discarding or releasing unwanted catch overboard, but there is a data gap regarding how those fish survive.

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Diversified Business Communications