National Fisherman


Goin' big

Longliners and trawlers take center stage at the nation's yards

By Michael Crowley

For the past few years, new boat construction for the West Coast and Alaska fisheries has been defined by gillnetters and 58-footers. But in the past year builders have seen a surge in the construction, rebuilding or extensive modifying of large boats for those fisheries. It's a case of upgrading older boats to make them more efficient and safer, sticking with proven designs, or in one case, jumping way ahead of the pack in terms of propulsion choices.

These four boats are perhaps an example of what other boat owners will be doing in the near future.

Bering Defender
In early 2011 the 164-foot Dona Martita was working the East Coast's herring and mackerel fisheries. Then the boat's owner, Global Seas in Seattle, decided to bring the boat back to Alaska, where she had been a crabber until 2001, and use her in the pollock fishery.

On the way to the West Coast, the Donna Martita pulled in to Patti Marine Enterprises in Pensacola, Fla., to be hauled out and rigged for her new fishery. When the boat left, she had a new name, Bering Defender, was longer by 10 feet, and had had a lot more work than originally planned.

The initial work order was pretty straightforward. The shipyard would cut off the bulwarks and deck gear. They would move up the trawl deck about 10 feet and install full-height bulwarks to provide the crew some shelter. Bringing the fish holds up to the new deck would increase hold capacity by 40 to 50 percent. They were to build two gantries and install new Rapp-Hydema winches. Up forward they would add a bulbous bow and back aft a stern extension.

Inside the Industry

The American Fisheries Society is honoring recently retired Florida Institute of Oceanography director Bill Hogarth with the Carl R. Sullivan Fishery Conservation Award — one of the nation's premier awards in fisheries science - in recognition of his long career and leadership in preserving some of the world's most threatened species, advocating for environmental protections and leading Florida's scientific response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

Read more ...

The Marine Stewardship Council has appointed Eric Critchlow as the new U.S. Program Director. Critchlow will be based in the MSC US headquarters in Seattle. He is a former vice president of Lusamerica Foods and has over 35 years in the seafood industry.

Read more ...
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