National Fisherman

Revving and rolling

Ladies and gentlemen, start your engines. And if the thought of that makes you cringe, have we got the spread for you. Our annual diesel directory is a prime source for any fisherman considering upgrading, downsizing or simply complying with the next tier requirement.

We've got a rundown of what's new and what's still to come, a profile on how synthetic oils could be the next hot thing; our listings of every commercial engine you could possibly be shopping for; and as always, success stories from fishermen just like you, all of whom are trading in their old iron for more efficient engines. It all starts on page 28.

If you get too revved up by the diesel directory, take an opportunity to slow things down with our cover story from Maine writer Brian Robbins. Brian has a way of capturing the spirit of life on the Maine coast, especially island life. His feature of the Early Bird (p. 26) is a classic Maine lobster boat story — the kind with a happy ending. It's the next best thing to a summer vacation on North Haven.

I feel like I'm taking a bit more of a gamble with an issue of the magazine if I have a feature story in it. There's something about that kind of writing that puts a little bit of your soul on the pages and into the hands of our gracious readers. This issue I had the opportunity to write about a wonderful couple I met in Petersburg, Alaska, this summer. We talk a lot about making a go of direct marketing — going out on a limb to manage your own fish-selling business on top of the business of catching fish.

What I love about the story of Lofoten Fish Co. and its owners, George Meintel and Cynthia Wallesz, is that they straddle the line between traditional and unconventional by direct marketing as well as delivering salmon to a big cannery in town. It's really a classic Alaska story. The folks up there are always redefining what it means to succeed in commercial fishing, and they've done it again.

Of course, George and Cynthia don't just do it for the money. For them, success is a happy customer and a full brailer. It's easy to tell when someone loves what they do. I consider myself lucky to be surrounded by folks like that in this industry. And that I get to do what I love by writing about them. I hope you'll enjoy the story on page 22.

- Jessica Hathaway

Inside the Industry

Pink shrimp is the first fishery managed by Washington to receive certification from the global Marine Stewardship Council fisheries standard for sustainable, wild-caught seafood.

The state’s fishery was independently assessed as a scope extension of the MSC certified Oregon pink shrimp fishery, which achieved certification to the MSC standard in December 2007 and attained recertification in February 2013.


NMFS has awarded 16 grants totaling more than $2.5 million as part of its Bycatch Reduction Engineering Program.

The program supports the development of technological solutions and changes in fishing practices designed to minimize bycatch and aims to to find creative approaches and strategies for reducing bycatch, seabird interactions, and post-release mortality in federally managed fisheries.

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Diversified Business Communications