National Fisherman

National Fisherman - May 2007

0507

Pacific Sardines

The money is in the largest fish, but catches tend toward smaller grades

The search for large sardines — and the development of stronger markets for smaller ones — continues along the coasts of California, Oregon and Washington.

The large 175-gram sardines, destined for Japan's longline bait markets, have garnered higher ex-vessel prices than smaller fish. The relative abundance of fish favored in the Japanese market, however, has been unreliable in the past few years, according to Mike Burner, staff officer with the Pacific Fishery Management Council, in Portland, Ore.

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Bulldozing common ground

I was disappointed, though not surprised, when I read a news account recently in which commercial clammers were accused of "strip-mining" Chesapeake Bay with their hydraulic dredges.

A strip mine is an open pit in which a seam of mineral ore near the surface is removed from the ground. Strip-mining creates ugly holes in the terrain around which detractors of the practice unite in opposition.

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Safekeeping

The loss of two New England draggers rekindles discussion about reducing risk to fishermen

By Becky W. Evans

On a stormy night in December 2004, the fishing vessel Northern Edge rolled over and sank off Nantucket when one of its scallop dredges got snagged on the ocean bottom. Five of the six fishermen aboard the 75-foot New Bedford, Mass., scalloper drowned. The sixth fisherman — who had had passed a mandatory fishermen's training program in Portugal — survived by swimming to the unopened life raft, inflating it and climbing inside.

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Northeast

Paper core lightens tuna boat; mold adapts to beam demands

It's been a while in the making, but this spring, a lot of people could be talking about the Emme, a Northern Bay 38 tuna boat, when she is hauled from the boatshop at Otis Enterprises Marine in Searsport, Maine, and slides into Penobscot Bay.

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Vessel exams prevent flooding, the most common cause of sinking

Based on U.S. Coast Guard reports

At approximately 1:30 p.m. on Jan. 13, 2004, a gillnet-rigged fishing vessel out of Gloucester, Mass., began taking on water. The 38-foot 14-gross-ton wooden-hulled vessel had a crew of three, including the master.

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National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 9/9/14

In this episode:

Seafood Watch upgrades status of 21 fish species
Calif. bill attacking seafood mislabeling approved
Ballot item would protect Bristol Bay salmon
NOAA closes cod, yellowtail fishing areas
Pacific panel halves young bluefin harvest

National Fisherman Live: 8/26/14

In this episode, National Fisherman Publisher Jerry Fraser talks about his early days dragging for redfish on the Vandal.

Inside the Industry

PORTLAND, Maine – The Maine Lobster Marketing Collaborative has appointed Matt Jacobson as its new executive director.
 
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The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council will convene its Red Snapper Advisory Panel Wednesday, July 30, 2014, from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. at the council office — 2203 N. Lois Avenue, Suite 1100, in Tampa, Fla. 

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