National Fisherman

National Fisherman - June 2009


Not going overboard

From U.S. Coast Guard reports.

Any fisherman worth his salt knows the corrosive effects of seawater, whether you've replaced electronics more times than you'd like to count or jury-rigged your gear to keep your extremities dry and, hopefully, warm. The ultimate hazard of the sea, however, is being immersed in it.


Gulf/South Atlantic Tuna

Summer and fall outlook up from '08, if sour economy doesn't dim demand

While prospects for a good summer and fall season remain alive for yellowfin tuna, the duration of the recession and its effects on high-end products like sashimi and tuna steaks in gourmet restaurants are anybody's guess at this point.


Ready for the long haul

Like any magazine, National Fisherman has undergone change over its many years in print. As many of you may know, either from memory or from our "Fishing Back When" page, NF's predecessor, Maine Coast Fisherman, was provincial and folksy, with lots of recipes, reports from "clam cops," and chatty notes from sundry lighthouse keepers Down East.



38-footer can get up and go; free hull at lobster boat races

In Addison, Maine, just across the town line from Jonesport, Guptill Custom Marine finished off and launched a Northern Bay 38 from Downeast Boats and Composites in Penobscot, Maine, on April 2.


Along the Chesapeake, building a skiff is an art

By Larry Chowning

For generations, flat-bottom and deadrise skiffs have provided stable platforms for commercial fishermen working the waters of Chesapeake Bay.
On Virginia's northern neck, several skiff builders are still turning out sturdy boats that are also pleasing to the eye. Francis Haynie, George Butler, and the father-and-son team of Andy and Myles Cockrell all come from a long heritage of boatbuilding.

Andy and Myles Cockrell
PVC: the best of two worlds
The Cockrells operate Cockrell's Marine Railway on the Little Wicomico River near Heathsville, where they have combined their talents to build a prototype of a 20' x 8' flat-bottom fishing skiff from sheets of polyvinylchloride, or PVC as it is better known.

Francis Haynie
A waterman's background
Since 1946, Francis Haynie, then 16 years old, has been building all types of wooden skiffs in Heathsville. He is typical of many old-time boatbuilders in that he has worked just about everything a Potomac River waterman would do.

George Butler
Working on the railway
Isaac Bailey ran a railway and built small wooden boats in Reedville as early as 1893. His ledger of that year states he built and sold round-bilged striker boats (used to direct — by oar or hand signal — which way a menhaden school was heading) for $60, flat-bottom skiffs for $12, and an unidentified type of sailboat for $120.

Inside the Industry

The anti-mining group Salmon Beyond Borders expressed disappointment and dismay last week at Alaska Governor Bill Walker’s announcement that he has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with B.C. Premier Christy Clark.

This came just days after his administration asked members of his newly-formed Transboundary Rivers Citizens Advisory Work Group to provide comment on a Draft Statement of Cooperation associated with Transboundary mining.


NMFS recently released a draft action plan for fish discard and release mortality science, creating a list of actions that they hope can better inform fisheries.

We know that fishermen have to deal with bycatch by discarding or releasing unwanted catch overboard, but there is a data gap regarding how those fish survive.

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