National Fisherman

National Fisherman - December 2013

NF Dec13 Cover

Gulf/South Atlantic Snapper

Low recruitment, management politics of rec overfishing worry Florida fleets

Looking toward 2014, the commercial snapper fisheries and the market that supports them generally look good. But the politics that determine management and how they could affect the market in the near future worries fishermen.


Safety is the first line of defense

From U.S. Coast Guard reports

Cold temperatures with 3-foot seas and 35-knot winds led a skipper to anchor his 86-foot shrimper and three-man crew about a mile off of southwest Louisiana one mid-December day.


A few good fishermen

Since 1975, whoever happens to be sitting at the helm of this magazine commits to the daunting task of naming Highliners from either the East and Gulf coasts or the West Coast and Alaska. It's a daunting task not because it is difficult to find worthy award recipients in the industry, but because the process of picking and choosing three people to honor for their life's work seems like too important an assignment to leave to one person.



Downsizing lobster boat saves fuel; 66-foot longliner for Nova Scotia

What's a good indication a boatshop is building a boat that meets a fisherman's needs? Probably when the fisherman comes back for a second boat — and a third.


National Fisherman's 2013 Highliners

Each of our Pacific Northwest and Alaska Highliners has his own center of focus and his sphere of influence. Robert Heyano of Dillingham, Alaska, has concentrated on his small fishing community and the greater region of Bristol Bay; Robert Hezel, of Clinton, Wash., has donated many personal hours to fleet safety, reducing the environmental effects of trawl gear and providing for the families of those lost at sea; while Jerry McCune, of Cordova, Alaska, has been a diplomat for Alaska fisheries at large, serving as president of United Fishermen of Alaska and the Cordova District Fishermen United and lobbying members of Congress on Capitol Hill — a world away from Alaska in many respects.


Inside the Industry

NMFS recently released a draft action plan for fish discard and release mortality science, creating a list of actions that they hope can better inform fisheries.

We know that fishermen have to deal with bycatch by discarding or releasing unwanted catch overboard, but there is a data gap regarding how those fish survive.


A new study has identified a set of features common to all ocean ecosystems that provide a visual diagnosis of the health of the underwater environment coastal communities rely on.

Together, the features detail cumulative effects of threats -- such as overfishing, pollution, and invasive species,  allowing responders to act faster to increase ocean resiliency and sustainability.

Try a FREE issue of National Fisherman

Fill out this order form, If you like the magazine, get the rest of the year for just $14.95 (12 issues in all). If not, simply write cancel on the bill, return it, and owe nothing.

First Name
Last Name
U.S. Canada Other

Postal/ Zip Code
© 2015 Diversified Business Communications
Diversified Business Communications