National Fisherman


Young man and the sea

Corey Arnold is one man with one camera, two careers, and the world of fishing at his feet

By Jessica Hathaway

Corey Arnold owes a lot to his dad, Chris. The elder Arnold was a nursery man, growing and selling avocados and tropical plants. Corey didn't follow in those career footsteps, but he did turn two of his dad's treasured hobbies into a career that spans decades and the globe, even though he is only 36 years old.

Arnold was born in San Diego, and now lives in Portland, Ore. He fishes every summer in Bristol Bay, Alaska, and goes wherever his camera, an exhibition of his photography or an irresistible fishing trip may lead him. On visiting Maine this summer, Arnold said he appreciates the fact that fishermen in the Pine Tree State live close to where they fish, that a sense of place connects their fishing grounds with their homes.

Though there are plenty of fishing towns to be discovered off the beaten path in Maine, they're a far cry from the unfathomable remoteness of Arnold's Bristol Bay setnet site, which holds its own appeal for a fisherman who really wants to get away from everything — excepting work and wildlife. This year, Arnold and his crew — fellow skipper Shayan Rohani and deckhands Billie Delaney, Tim Sohn, and Seth Piracci — loaded up Arnold's duo of 22-foot aluminum skiffs, including a newbuild from Alexander Boat Works in Everett, Wash. (see Around the Yards West on page 47), and headed for Alaska's Kvichak River.

Inside the Industry

NOAA recently published a proposed rule that would implement a traceability plan to help combat IUU fishing. The program would seek to trace the origins of imported seafood by setting up reporting and filing procedures for products entering the U.S.

The traceability program would collect data on harvest, landing, and chain of custody of fish and fish products that have been identified as particularly vulnerable to IUU fishing and fraud.

Read more...

The following was released by the Maine Department of Marine Resources on Jan. 22:

The Maine Department of Marine Resources announced an emergency regulation that will support the continued rebuilding effort in Maine’s scallop fishery. The rule, effective January 23, 2016, will close the Muscle Ridge Area near South Thomaston and the Western Penobscot Bay Area.

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