National Fisherman

The Rudderpost 

jesJes Hathaway is the editor in chief of National Fisherman magazine and NationalFisherman.com.

 

Ask 10 people to define a sustainable fishery, and you're likely to get 10 different answers. Some define it as one that is harvested at a sustainable rate, such that the fish population does not decline over time as a result of fishing practices. How lovely would it be if we understood so much about the oceans that we could actually tell with little doubt when the effects of biomass change were strictly the result of fishing or some other factor?

When it comes to U.S. fisheries, overall we're doing well, despite the lack of a consistent definition of what exactly it is that we're striving to achieve. But where we're failing, we're failing in a tremendously damaging way.

The Center for Sustainable Fisheries — led by Dr. Brian Rothschild, former Rep. Barney Frank and former New Bedford, Mass., Mayor Scott Lang — is seeking to reverse those damages by rewriting the National Standards in the Magnuson-Stevens Act. The aim is to focus on improving data and finding a better balance between sustaining fish populations and the communities that depend on those resources.

In New England, entire communities of fishermen are on the precipice (or beyond) as a result of poorly managed groundfish and shrimp stocks. People who don't understand all the intricacies of the groundfish fishery like to blame the fishermen for overfishing and call it a day.

But the fishery has been federally managed for decades, and in those decades, it has declined steadily. Also in those decades, many other fisheries have recovered from population depletion — as a result of management changes, habitat improvement, climatic shifts and in some cases dumb luck.

New England groundfish stands as an icon for fisheries management failures. We clearly did not fully understand the effects of the fleets foreign trawlers on our stocks before we kicked them to the curb nearly 40 years ago. We clearly did not understand the effects of improved fishing technology and federally incentivized fish-boat-building loans that encouraged any Tom, Dick or Harry to build a boat and go fishing. We most certainly did not understand the nature of spiny dogfish — cod's top competitor for resources — when we protected it from so-called overfishing and sent its numbers soaring to unmanageable highs, meanwhile strangling the market for the now Marine Stewardship Council-certified fishery.

We did not understand how significantly any one of these factors would hamstring the New England groundfish fishery. And now we're asking entire fishing communities to pay for our failures by effectively shutting down their source of livelihood. And why? Because we have clear data that shows the state of the stocks? No, that we don't have. If we did, the shuttering would be a bitter but tolerable pill to swallow. All we have is our best guess and a draconian federal law that says since the management system didn't find a way to turn around decades of damage in the span of 10 years, then the fishing communities have to pay for the lack of results.

Those same communities that followed the rules year in and year out, watching the slow contrition with little source of hope, now find that they're paying a terrible price despite their efforts to do the right thing.

And yet, even with a declared federal disaster, there is little sympathy for the region's fishermen. Many of them have relied on the winter Northern shrimp fishery to make up a little for the lack of access to groundfish. But this year, that fishery has been shut down entirely, largely because warming waters have hampered reproduction.

Sustaining New England's historic fishing communities will have to come from the first definition of the word: capable of being supported or upheld, as by having its weight borne from below.

In times of great need, we have to support our fishing communities, either from above or below. I hope efforts to sustain all of America's fishing fleets will lead to some changes in the Magnuson-Stevens Act that can strike a better balance and establish the groundwork for a truly sustainable industry.

Add a comment

For those of you who love fishing, being in the backwoods and men with beards, Animal Planet is prepared to help you ring in the New Year with glee.

Beginning on Thursday, Jan. 2, "Cold River Cash" will follow three teams of Maine elver (baby eel) fishermen through eight episodes as they bring new meaning to the term "making bank."

2013 1226 CRCAs NF Assistant Editor Melissa Wood found when she visited the northeast corner of the state during the same season the show was being filmed, there is a lot of money to be made in elvers. And there's a good bit of lawlessness, too. With a fishery that takes place overnight on Maine's rural riverbanks, and a catch that yields as much as $2,000 a pound, the elver fishery is known for poaching, robbery and warden raids.

This season's teams are the Maineiacs, from Scarborough — Lee Leavitt, his son Jason Leavitt and Jason's brother-in-law Mike Bradley; the Eelinators, from Brunswick — brothers Dana and Chris Hole and their friend, Ken Cornelison (the three brought in $600,000 during one eel season); and the Grinders, from Hebron — brothers Chad and Justin Jordan.

If you can't wait until Jan. 2, check out Melissa's slide show of her elver adventure, and an excerpt from her feature in the magazine.

Happy New Year, and happy fishing!

Photo: Justin Jordan, Lester Toothaker and Chad Jordan of Team Grinders as seen on Cold River Cash; Animal Planet/David Johnson

Add a comment

This week, Coast Guard Petty Officer Third Class Travis Obendorf died after he was injured while assisting a disabled fishing boat in Alaska's Bering Sea near Amak Island.

I write often about the sacrifices fishermen make for their work and the fact that they put their lives on the line every day to bring food to our tables. Members of the Coast Guard put their lives on the line to bring fishermen home when no one else can.

2013 12319 AlaskaMistObendorf was serving on the Coast Guard cutter Waesche, which was helping to evacuate nonessential crew of the 166-foot catcher-processor Alaska Mist on Nov. 11 before the cutter towed the fishing boat to safety. Obendorf was injured during the evacuation and was air-lifted first to Anchorage and later transferred to Seattle, where he died after surgery and surrounded by his family.

“Petty Officer Obendorf’s selfless actions directly contributed to rescuing five mariners in distress. His willingness to assist others, even amidst the dangerous environment of the Bering Sea, truly embodies the Coast Guard’s core values,” said Waesche’s commanding officer, Capt. John McKinley. “Travis will be sadly missed.”

My thoughts are with Travis Obendorf's family and friends as they navigate a difficult passage this Christmas and new year. Many thanks to the Coast Guard for making the ocean a safer place to work.

Photo: Coast Guard cutter Waesche crew evacuates nonessential crew members from the disabled catcher-processor Alaska Mist on the Bering Sea near Amak Island, Alaska, Nov. 11; U.S. Coast Guard

Add a comment

I read the opening lines of New York fisherman Mark Lofstad's rescue at sea story with a familiar sense of wonder and fear. What must it be like to recognize that you're in the situation of having to place a distress call? How long must the minutes feel as they tick by when you're awaiting rescue that may or may not come in time? These are the questions I ask myself when I read any survival tale.

With the help of other fishing boats, the Coast Guard came to the rescue for Lofstad and his crew on the F/V Tradition. If only the feds had the same sense of urgency to rescue the entire industry and with it an American tradition that has been set adrift in many ways.

2013 1210 RescueI know some advocates of finfish aquaculture say their business models will offer fishermen a job to turn to when their fisheries can't support their livelihoods anymore. But some of those same businesses consistently contaminate the waters that support wild fisheries.

And as we look down the barrel at FDA-approved Frankenfish salmon, we can no longer deny the brave new world we face. The final frontier isn't out there, in the endless ether of the universe. Rather it's microscopic — contained in the perils of a petri dish. But its possibilities are no less immeasurable. We hold the future in our hands.

Tradition has been set adrift, but it's not underwater, yet. The question is whether rescue will come in time.

Illustration: Artist's rendering of a successful rescue at sea; USCG

Add a comment

Anytime we mention our Crew Shots issue, we get an outpouring of positive feedback and an influx of new photos.

I'd like to keep it that way. The health of our fisheries and working waterfronts is at stake every day. As Congress continues the process of examining, holding hearings on and reauthorizing the Magnuson-Stevens Act, your livelihoods will be on the chopping block.

Our January issue features a Dock Talk written by Jim Kendall, a board member at the Center for Sustainable Fisheries, explaining the center's mission to preserve "our nation's fishery resources through conservation measures as well as promoting economic development for the fishing economy through the use of science."

Dr. Brian Rothschild, president and CEO of the Center for Sustainable Fisheries, Montgomery Charter Professor Emeritus of the University of Massachusetts School for Marine Science and Technology and 2012 NF Lifetime Achievement Award Winner, was our keynote speaker at Pacific Marine Expo this year.

In his speech, he recommended rewriting the Magnuson Act so that its enforcement could more accurately target problems in fishery management. Rothschild said that when the act was implemented, it was widely believed that all 10 national standards would be enforced equally. But since then, National Standard 1 — preventing overfishing and maintaining optimum yield — has been enforced as the top priority.

Not only does Rothschild want to rewrite the act to whittle down the National Standards from 10 to five, but he wants to focus on improving the science used to manage fisheries. Better data would provide managers with a clearer picture not only of the state of fisheries but of the socioeconomic effects of fisheries on their communities.

It's an idea whose time has come. For more information, please visit the Center for Sustainable Fisheries and continue to follow our coverage here and in the magazine.

Add a comment

When I was growing up in Georgia, I always enjoyed Thanksgiving. But it wasn't until I moved to New England and began to celebrate the holiday at a sprawling Colonial home with massive fireplaces, bittersweet wreaths and snowy walks that I began to understand the feel of the holiday. The classic New England dishes suddenly made sense, though I would never celebrate without my mom's famous pecan pie.

I've been enjoying Thanksgiving at the same house for many years now, catching up with family and always meeting a new friend or welcoming a new member of the family. That's how I feel every year when I find myself in Seattle for Pacific Marine Expo. While the show is a whirlwind for many of us, I just love the opportunity to catch up with old friends and make new ones, ogle the engines and find out what's new in gear.

The Expo closed on Friday after a bustling three days on the show floor, in conference sessions and after hours at a plethora of industry events. I've been to eight Expos, but none compares with this year. The Pacific Northwest and Alaska are absolutely booming with fishing, boatbuilding and outfitting. Check out our slideshow for images from the show floor.

On Wednesday, Brian Rothschild, president and CEO of the Center for Sustainable Fisheries, delivered a groundbreaking keynote address on reforming (rewriting) the Magnuson-Stevens Act. Thursday's Boatyard Day was thoroughly entertaining, beginning with roundups of the year's best fish boats and workboats and ending with a fantastic address on the future of West Coast boatbuilding by Frank Foti, president and CEO of Vigor Industrial.

Friday began for me with a three-hour Profitable Harvest conference that yielded critical information for growing your business in this changing industry. The show floor, meanwhile, swayed to the poetic stylings of the Fisher Poets, followed by the Fisherman of the Year contest. Reid Ten Kley took the top prize again this year.

We hope to see you again next year. Have a happy Thanksgiving!

Add a comment

The editors of National Fisherman and WorkBoat welcome you to the 46th annual Pacific Marine Expo. Make sure you hit the floor running this year, because the show is bigger than ever. For three days under one roof, you’ll find a bounty of boats, gear and events designed just for you.

Today’s conference sessions include a keynote address from fishery scientist Brian Rothschild, ABS initiatives in safe shipping and a roundup of fishermen’s wives on how to stay grounded in the fishing industry.

Stop by booth 614 to say hello and take advantage of our show subscription special — just $10 for a year of National Fisherman!

 
Add a comment

I was having a conversation with someone the other day about China's one-child policy. He was saying, essentially, that the ramifications for not following the policy are so steep that only the richest Chinese families can afford to have more than one child, and the rest of the people live in fear of being jailed, fined beyond their means or the unmentionably worse.

The problem is that China uses the stick instead of the carrot to sway its citizens to comply. Instead of creating an incentive for the people to follow the policy, it simply punishes them for not following it. We manage fisheries (and many industries) the same way. Perhaps at one time it seemed justified to flail fleets with drastic measures. But we now live in a time of primarily flourishing fisheries.

It seems the species that still need some work are the only ones that get any press. I saw a headline this week, "Kings left out of Alaska's salmon boom." Four species are going like gangbusters, and we can only focus on the one that isn't. What gives? I'll tell you, it's the stick.

What this industry needs is incentives. With the right motivation, we can keep fishermen fishing for a real living wage while keeping the fisheries within acceptable levels of biomass and bycatch.

Instead of forcing fishermen to buy into a single fishery through a quota system (imagining that they would be proper stewards of the resource if they were specifically invested in it — the fallacy there being the assumption that they weren't stewards of the resource already), why not create incentives for them to move from fishery to fishery, and therefore, always have a healthy stock to fish?

Reducing effort doesn't always bring back a species. Sometimes environmental conditions create or reinforce a stock's depletion. But if fishermen have some other fishery to fall back on, then the fishermen will have the best chance of surviving in the long term, and so will their stocks.

And more than anything, we must recognize that the ocean is a complicated place. If we are going to punish commercial fishermen for everything that happens there, then we all might as well get used to the taste of fish farmed in inland ponds. Bad press is fodder for endless lawsuits and legislation from private groups and business owners who seek to take advantage of the mainstream image and alienate fishermen even further.

Sport-fishing interests last week did just that and are petitioning to ban setnets in urban areas of Alaska and hand over more king salmon quotas to recreational fishermen. Fishermen across the country faced and are facing net bans as a result of sport fishing interests appealing ostensibly to conservationists but in reality are attempting to reallocate commercial catches to recreational fishermen. Where is the conservation in reallocation of the same fish? It's not about conservation. It's about perception.

National Fisherman, NOAA, the Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute and others are working to educate the public about what makes commercial fishing valuable to our national economy and to the health of its citizens as well as making the industry more user-friendly. Please join us for Profitable Harvest at Seattle's Pacific Marine Expo next Friday, Nov. 22, as we start to move this mission forward.

Add a comment

The story of Alaska Longline's new fleet member is even bigger than the 136-foot Arctic Prowler. It's bigger still than Vigor Alaska's new 250-foot-long assembly hall in Ketchikan from which the Arctic Prowler launched in mid-October.

2013 1107 ArcticProwlerWhat makes this story so huge is more than the sum of its parts — the Arctic Prowler is the largest fishing boat to be built in Alaska, it was built in a state-of-the art facility, and it's one of the first American fishing boats to be built to class specifications.

All of these factors combined show that the companies invested in this project are setting the stage. Arctic Prowler may be breaking the mold, but in doing so, it's paving the way for more big things to come. And there will be more.

Join us for a celebration of industry boatbuilding and a keynote address from Vigor Industrial President & CEO Frank Foti at Pacific Marine Expo's Boatyard Day, Thursday, Nov. 21 at CenturyLink Field Event Center in Seattle.

Read the full story on the Arctic Prowler in the NF December issue, starting on page 36.

Add a comment

Everyone in our office is getting excited about Pacific Marine Expo, just two weeks away. This is setting up to be a huge show, from Boatyard Day and the Fisher Poets to the Fisherman of the Year Contest and daily prize drawings.

This year's Profitable Harvest program on Friday, Nov. 22, promises to be a great jumping off point for my favorite industry topic: educating the public about the American fishing industry. An informed consumer can raise the profile of the industry as well as the value of seafood.

Three panels of industry leaders will drive the conversation, starting with a presentation of ground-breaking research from the Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute, a discussion on improving community perception of the fishing industry, and wrapping with how to get the most from your boat with an expanded fishing portfolio. We'll also look at securing a legacy by bringing young people into the industry.

The program kicks off with a National Fisherman Breakfast with the Editors, but it's limited to the first 100, so sign up today!

The Expo and Profitable Harvest are all about focusing energy on this great industry. Join us to celebrate and keep the momentum going.

Add a comment

Page 4 of 31

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 7/17/14

In this episode, National Fisherman's Boats & Gear Editor Michael Crowley talks with Mike Hillers about the Simrad PX Multisensor.

 

National Fisherman Live: 7/8/14

In this episode:

  • Obama proposes initiative on tracking fish
  • Council retains haddock bycatch limit
  • Columbia River salmon plan challenged
  • Virginia approves reduction in blue crab harvest
  • Ala. shrimpers hope to net some jumbo profits

 

Inside the Industry

PORTLAND, Maine – The Maine Lobster Marketing Collaborative has appointed Matt Jacobson as its new executive director.
 
 Read more...

The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council will convene its Red Snapper Advisory Panel Wednesday, July 30, 2014, from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. at the council office — 2203 N. Lois Avenue, Suite 1100, in Tampa, Fla. 

Read more...

Try a FREE issue of National Fisherman

Fill out this order form, If you like the magazine, get the rest of the year for just $14.95 (12 issues in all). If not, simply write cancel on the bill, return it, and owe nothing.

First Name
Last Name
Address
Country
U.S. Canada Other

City
State/Province
Postal/ Zip Code
Email