National Fisherman

The Rudderpost 

jesJes Hathaway is the editor in chief of National Fisherman magazine and NationalFisherman.com.

 

In an odd and happy coincidence this week, I heard a story about scientists producing the next generation of biofuels with algae. And lo and behold, Mother Nature is growing it for us in big, stringy batches in the Chukchi Sea!
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I have to admit, when I read the news of Exxon's opting not to appeal the 9th Circuit Court's ruling that the oil giant must pay interest on its meager settlement in the 20-year Valdez fight I was first excited for the stakeholders, then a little suspicious.

Why would Exxon give up their epic battle now, especially after their series of victories that slowly ratcheted down the damages due from $5 billion to roughly $500 million?
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Great news out of Maine this week (nope, not the tangle over sector management) is Commerce Secretary Gary Locke's appointment of Glen Libby to the New England Fishery Management Council.

Libby, of Port Clyde, Maine, is the chairman of the Midcoast Fishermen's Association and a pioneer of community-based fishing.
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It's been about a decade since the big news in seafood consumption was alarmingly high levels of methylmercury in tuna — leading to warnings that children and pregnant women should limit their consumption or eliminate the fish from their diets altogether.
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I love grilling season.

It gives us a chance to move away from the gas grill that sits outside the kitchen door and into the yard, where we keep our charcoal grill.

There's nothing better than the smoky flavor of lump charcoal or mesquite, especially when it comes to searing tuna.

This salad feeds two tuna lovers.

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Ingredients

1/2 pound sushi-grade yellowfin tuna
1/2 pound new potatoes, lightly boiled and split
1/4 pound haricots vert (or skinny green beans), blanched, cooled and cut into 2-inch pieces
1/2 cup grape or cherry tomatoes, split
1/2 cup pitted Niçoise olives (calamatas will do, too)
2 eggs, hard-boiled (careful to keep the yolks yellow)* and quartered
Half a head of romaine lettuce, rinsed and dry
Capers, parsley and chives to garnish

Dressing (blend and serve immediately)

2 tablespoons white wine vinegar or fresh lemon juice
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
1 tablespoon honey
Anchovy paste, salt and pepper to taste
1/4 cup olive oil (regular or extra virgin)
If you like your tuna black and blue, then just sear it on high heat on the grill. (Make sure you do not use lighter fluid if you're going to put your fish in the flame!) Let it cool slightly, then slice as you like.

* To keep your hard-boiled egg yolks from turning green, dry and pasty, try bringing them to a boil in a covered pan of cold water, boil for three minutes, then turn off the heat and uncover the pan. Wait until the eggs are almost cool enough to touch to peel and serve.

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Florida longliner Solomon Rodney thought he had a pretty cool find on one of his grouper hooks late last month: an 8-foot missile.

He fixed the missile to his boat, the Bold Venture, where it proudly rode the waves for the remaining 10 days of his trip.

The problem, as the bomb squad at MacDill Air Force Base sees it, is this missile wasn't just cool; it was hot.
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Yesterday, famed fishing captain Linda Greenlaw was convicted in a Canadian court for crossing the international boundary and fishing illegally in Canadian waters.

According to various reports, Greenlaw claims her longline gear had been snagged by another boat and dragged about five miles across the Hague Line.
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This is a perfect late spring meal, because it's hearty, but lightened with spring vegetables and delicious halibut.

My favorite way to cook and eat halibut is grilled with a touch of olive oil, salt and pepper. It doesn't need much adornment.

This meal works best with a grill cook and a stove-top cook, because you can't leave your risotto unattended while it cooks, and you definitely don't want it to sit around long after it's done.

We have long winters here in Maine, so we have a small gas grill right outside the kitchen door that allows us to grill year-round. It also comes in handy for meals like this!


Ingredients

1 1/2 to 2 pounds halibut fillets
Olive oil
1 small sweet onion (or 1/2 leek*), chopped
1 cup arborio rice
4 cups low-sodium chicken broth (or 1/2 cup white wine and 3 1/2 cups broth)
2-4 strands saffron
1 cup sugar snap peas, chopped (or fresh peas, shelled)
1 bunch asparagus, stems trimmed (about a pound)
1/2 cup parmesan cheese
Salt and pepper
Lemon
Optional garnishes: parsley and scallions

Season and oil your fish and asparagus so they are ready for the grill.

Put a medium, heavy-bottom saucepan on medium heat and add a tablespoon or two of olive oil. Once it's warm, add your onions and cook until translucent. If the pan is dry, add more oil, then add the arborio. Stir and cook the rice until its edges are translucent. Toss in your saffron and some salt and pepper.

Add half a cup of chicken broth or the white wine. Cook, stirring, until the pan is almost dry. Adjust the heat so you're cooking the risotto at a simmer.

Add the chicken broth half a cup at a time, stirring as it cooks. About 15 minutes into the risotto cooking, have the grill cook start the asparagus and halibut.

When the asparagus is off the grill, chop it into 1/2-inch pieces and add it and the peas to the risotto right after you add the last 1/2 cup of chicken broth.

When the risotto is close to the consistency you want, add the parmesan and salt and pepper to taste.

Serve in bowls with slices of the halibut on top. Garnish with chopped parsley and/or scallions and a hearty squeeze of fresh lemon. Serves four.

* If you use a leek, it's easiest to clean it after it's chopped. There are lots of places for dirt to hide in leek leaves, and you don't want a gritty risotto.

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I guess the EU ban on seal products is supposed to indicate that we've evolved somehow.

The ban is a political move intended to force Canada to do away with its annual seal hunt, which apparently the parliamentarians view as barbaric. But it all reeks of pretension to me.
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CatchCon was a boatload of fun! Discovery Channel held the first event designed for "Deadliest Catch" fans in Seattle the last weekend in April.

Fans were ushered between games, boat tours, autograph sessions, U.S. Coast Guard drills and panel discussions. They hammed it up with the captains and crew, took pictures and had as much "Deadliest Catch" fun as you can have on land. 

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Page 27 of 32

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 11/06/14

In this episode:

NOAA report touts 2013 landings, value increases
Panama fines GM salmon company Aquabounty
Gulf council passes Reef Fish Amendment 40
Maine elver quota cut by 2,000 pounds
Offshore mussel farm would be East Coast’s first

 

Inside the Industry

EAST SAND ISLAND, Oregon—Alexa Piggott is crawling through a dark, dusty, narrow tunnel on this 62-acre island at the mouth of the Columbia River. On the ground above her head sit thousands of seabirds. Piggott, a crew leader with Bird Research Northwest, is headed for an observation blind from which she'll be able to count them.
 
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NOAA and its fellow Natural Resource Damage Assessment trustees in the Deepwater Horizon oil spill have announced the signing of a formal Record of Decision to implement a gulf restoration plan. The 44 projects, totaling an estimated $627 million, will restore barrier islands, shorelines, dunes, underwater grasses and oyster beds.

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