National Fisherman

The Rudderpost 

jesJes Hathaway is the editor in chief of National Fisherman magazine and NationalFisherman.com.

 

Ten years ago, El Nino was throwing West Coast fishermen for a loop. Warming water temperatures led to migrating species.

Now fishermen in California, Oregon and Washington are dodging dead zones and Marine Protected Areas, and some would argue that the difficulties are all man-made.

Today's Los Angeles Times article "Dead zones off Oregon and Washington likely tied to global warming, study says," reports that a group of scientists from Oregon State University believe the growing dead zones off the northwest coast are the result of global warming.

Scientists were tipped off to the study by crabbers who found pots full of dead, dying or very weak crab. It was like nothing they'd ever seen.

The record-breaking dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico has been tied to fertilization of corn crops, which are growing by the square mile to respond to the call for ethanol as an alternative fuel.

While it's clear we have to do something to prevent dead zones, I worry about how the solutions will affect fishermen.

So many American farmers have lost their land to expanding suburbs, and others can't find two dimes to rub together because cheap imports have taken over the market. It's not a stretch to correlate dead zones to suburbs and cheap imports to, well, cheap imports.

Farmers markets, community supported agriculture (the CSAs that provide the abundant farm boxes so many of us have come to rely on) and the popularity of heirloom varieties are the response to mass-market, often bland produce. And those efforts are keeping many small U.S. farms alive.

But it takes an informed, involved public to keep those efforts going. It's up to us to do the same thing for fishing.

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 10/21/14

In this episode:

North Pacific Council adjusts observer program
Fishermen: bluefin fishing best in 10 years
Catch limit raised for Bristol Bay red king crab
Canadian fishermen fight over lobster size rules
River conference addresses Dead Zone cleanup

National Fisherman Live: 10/7/14

In this episode, National Fisherman Publisher Jerry Fraser talks about the 1929 dragger Vandal.

 

Inside the Industry

NOAA and its fellow Natural Resource Damage Assessment trustees in the Deepwater Horizon oil spill have announced the signing of a formal Record of Decision to implement a gulf restoration plan. The 44 projects, totaling an estimated $627 million, will restore barrier islands, shorelines, dunes, underwater grasses and oyster beds.

Read more...

The Golden Gate Salmon Association will host its 4th Annual Marin County Dinner at Marin Catholic High School, 675 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., Kentfield on Friday, Oct 10, with doors opening at 5:30 p.m.

Read more...

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