National Fisherman

The Rudderpost 

jesJes Hathaway is the editor in chief of National Fisherman magazine and NationalFisherman.com.

 

Ten years ago, El Nino was throwing West Coast fishermen for a loop. Warming water temperatures led to migrating species.

Now fishermen in California, Oregon and Washington are dodging dead zones and Marine Protected Areas, and some would argue that the difficulties are all man-made.

Today's Los Angeles Times article "Dead zones off Oregon and Washington likely tied to global warming, study says," reports that a group of scientists from Oregon State University believe the growing dead zones off the northwest coast are the result of global warming.

Scientists were tipped off to the study by crabbers who found pots full of dead, dying or very weak crab. It was like nothing they'd ever seen.

The record-breaking dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico has been tied to fertilization of corn crops, which are growing by the square mile to respond to the call for ethanol as an alternative fuel.

While it's clear we have to do something to prevent dead zones, I worry about how the solutions will affect fishermen.

So many American farmers have lost their land to expanding suburbs, and others can't find two dimes to rub together because cheap imports have taken over the market. It's not a stretch to correlate dead zones to suburbs and cheap imports to, well, cheap imports.

Farmers markets, community supported agriculture (the CSAs that provide the abundant farm boxes so many of us have come to rely on) and the popularity of heirloom varieties are the response to mass-market, often bland produce. And those efforts are keeping many small U.S. farms alive.

But it takes an informed, involved public to keep those efforts going. It's up to us to do the same thing for fishing.

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 1/27/15

In this episode:

Assessment: Atlantic menhaden is not overfished
Bering Sea pollock fishery casts off
Dock to Dish opens Florida’s first CSF
Second wave of disaster funds for Alaska
Fisherman lands N.C.’s largest bluefin ever

Inside the Industry

The Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute is still seeking public review and comment on the Alaska Responsible Fisheries Management Conformance Criteria (Version 1.2, September 2011). The public review and comment period, which opened on Dec. 3, 2014, runs through Monday, Feb. 3.

Read more...

NOAA, in consultation with the Department of the Interior, has appointed 10 new members to the Marine Protected Areas Federal Advisory Committee. The 20-member committee is composed of individuals with diverse backgrounds and experience who advise the departments of commerce and the interior on ways to strengthen and connect the nation's MPA programs. The new members join the 10 continuing members appointed in 2012.

Read more...

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