National Fisherman

The Rudderpost 

jesJes Hathaway is the editor in chief of National Fisherman magazine and NationalFisherman.com.

 

Yesterday the Seattle Times published an opinion piece by Bruce Babbitt, former secretary of the Interior, in which Babbitt denounces the supporters of Pebble Mine, a project proposed for Alaska’s Bristol Bay.

2014 0715 NoPebble“The question of whether to build a massive copper mine in the heart of the planet’s largest wild sockeye salmon fishery has a simple answer: no,” Babbit writes. “Pebble is the wrong mine in absolutely the wrong place.”

This week, the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee is likely to thumb its nose at the widespread support of Bristol Bay’s fishermen, who fear the long-term effects of toxic mining waste at the headwaters of their historic fishery.

While thousands of Bristol Bay fishermen are taking advantage of a banner fishing year and the opportunity to supply the world with half its wild salmon, the House committee’s Water Resources Subcommittee today held an oversight hearing on EPA’s 404(c) authority with no witnesses from Bristol Bay. EPA has declared Pebble a risk too great under the Clean Water Act.

Whatever you think of the EPA in general, if you’re a fisherman or enjoy eating wild fish, you most certainly should care about clean water. And for that matter, you should be concerned about these attempts at undermining federal oversight of clean water and fisheries.

Last week I wrote about Louisiana’s senators attempting to push through two bills that would strip the Gulf of Mexico management council of its authority to oversee red snapper quota, all because sport fishermen believe they are getting a raw deal and despite the fact that the council has gone above and beyond to address their concerns.

Our federal management system is far from perfect, but we risk losing all the ground we’ve recovered on our middling reputation with the public (read: seafood buyers) if we keep stripping away the government’s ability to ensure that our fleets have quota to fish and clean waters in which to catch our food.

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 3/10/15

In this episode, Online Editor Leslie Taylor talks with Mike McLouglin, vice president of Dunlop Industrial and Protective Footwear.

National Fisherman Live: 2/24/15

In this episode:

March date set for disaster aid dispersal
Oregon LNG project could disrupt fishing
NOAA tweaks gear marking requirement
N.C. launches first commercial/recreational dock
Spiny lobster traps limits not well received

Inside the Industry

The New England Fishery Management Council  is soliciting applications for seats on the Northeast Trawl Survey Advisory Panel and the deadline to apply is July 31 at 5:00 p.m.

The panel will consist of 16 members including members of the councils and the Atlantic States Fishery Commission, industry experts, non-federal scientists and Northeast Fisheries Science Center scientists. Panel members are expected to serve for three years.

Read more...

Commercial salmon fishermen will have 12 hours to fish Oregon's lower Columbia River, starting at 7 p.m. tonight.

Biologists upgraded their forecast for the summer king run to 120,000, the largest since at least 1960.

Read more...
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