National Fisherman

The Rudderpost 

jesJes Hathaway is the editor in chief of National Fisherman magazine and NationalFisherman.com.

 

Herring was a hot topic in New England yesterday.

First, the New England Fishery Management Council approved a draft of Amendment 5 to the herring fishery management plan that includes an alternative requiring at-sea observers for every boat on every trip in the midwater trawl fleet.

Ostensibly, the goal is to reduce the midwater fleet's bycatch of groundfish and river herring. From my perspective, the mere speculation that one fleet is damaging other fisheries is not enough to put the smack down on that fleet and ask them to pay for it, to boot.

If the federal government (by way of the council) sees fit to put observers on every boat and every trip, then so be it. Perhaps the data collected would be worth the trouble. But the federal government ought to pony up the dough to pay for the extra oversight.

However, the real question in my mind is why the midwater fleet is taking so much heat? They are being blamed for damage to groundfish spawning areas and scooping up Gulf of Maine river herring as bycatch.

I attended a presentation at the Gulf of Maine Research Institute last night that addressed the river herring bycatch part of the problem. Mike Armstrong from the Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries, last night's speaker, has been studying East Coast river herring for five years.

What he and fellow researchers have discovered is that the decline in river herring was sparked many years before the midwater fleet began fishing and in fact has no single smoking gun.

A long list of contributing factors includes, dams, waterfront development, human and animal predation (including species we now protect, like cormorants and seals), water withdrawals, deteriorating habitat and water quality, and yes, bycatch.

Bycatch is one of the multitude of problems contributing to a very long-term decline in river herring. And as Armstrong points out, we ought to be applying the same common-sense approach to solving problems associated with fishing as we apply to the problems associated with development.

We are not going to try to end housing development, so why are we toying with the idea of dealing a crippling blow to the midwater fleet?

Bycatch is not destroying river herring. No one thing is. Our approach should be to limit destructive influences from all contributing factors without the goal of shutting down successful American businesses.

We ought to turn our focus away from the midwater fleet and toward the river herring. Creating an environment in which the herring can thrive is more worthwhile than creating an environment in which an entire fleet cannot.

River herring will survive, as recent upticks in their population have shown. But the midwater fleet may not. A fair warning to those who cheer that possibility: Next time, it might be your livelihood on the chopping block.

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 10/21/14

In this episode:

North Pacific Council adjusts observer program
Fishermen: bluefin fishing best in 10 years
Catch limit raised for Bristol Bay red king crab
Canadian fishermen fight over lobster size rules
River conference addresses Dead Zone cleanup

National Fisherman Live: 10/7/14

In this episode, National Fisherman Publisher Jerry Fraser talks about the 1929 dragger Vandal.

 

Inside the Industry

NOAA and its fellow Natural Resource Damage Assessment trustees in the Deepwater Horizon oil spill have announced the signing of a formal Record of Decision to implement a gulf restoration plan. The 44 projects, totaling an estimated $627 million, will restore barrier islands, shorelines, dunes, underwater grasses and oyster beds.

Read more...

The Golden Gate Salmon Association will host its 4th Annual Marin County Dinner at Marin Catholic High School, 675 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., Kentfield on Friday, Oct 10, with doors opening at 5:30 p.m.

Read more...

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