National Fisherman


The Rudderpost 

jesJes Hathaway is the editor in chief of National Fisherman magazine and NationalFisherman.com.

 

Spring is finally starting to peek through the snow banks here in Maine, and that means it's time for the International Boston Seafood Show.

With so much happening on every coast, I am eager to get together with folks from Alaska, the West Coast and the Gulf of Mexico early next week.

The big news on the Gulf Coast this week was that the International Trade Commission upheld tariffs on imported frozen warm-water shrimp.

This extends the five-year reprieve for gulf shrimpers who have been hit with one catastrophe after another and are still recovering from the oil spill that began last April.

The import tax keeps the price of domestic shrimp more competitive with that of the foreign supply at a time when shrimpers need every penny they can get. While the tariff has not allowed fishermen to increase their market share, it has helped them hold on.

In fishing these days, that's often the best one can hope for.

Speaking of best hopes, our hearts go out to those on the West Coast who were affected by the tsunami. Crescent City, Calif., and Brookings, Ore., took the brunt of the damage stateside.

Susan Chambers, deputy director of the West Coast Seafood Processors Association, visited both harbors early this week. Check out some of her photos on our home page. Her Dock Talk piece on the effects and fallout from these two fishing ports appears in our upcoming May issue.

Let us not forget that fishermen are ever at the mercy of the powerful forces of nature. I hope that encourages fishermen to be safer at sea and also give those who look down on the industry a moment's pause before striking out at the hardworking members of our fishing fleets.

Inside the Industry

The Downeast Salmon Federation has received a major grant from the U.S. Endowment for Forestry and Communities to ensure and improve the water quality of eastern Maine’s most important rivers, according to the Ellsworth American.

Read more...

Louisiana crab fishermen and their catch are feeling the pressure of a downturn in the state economy, and a resulting upturn of people entering the fishery.

“It’s a crazy business right now,” said Pete Gerica, the New Orleans fisherman who now serves as president or the Louisiana Crab Task Force, a legislatively-created board of industry voices that makes recommendations to state government.

Read more...

Try a FREE issue of National Fisherman

Fill out this order form, If you like the magazine, get the rest of the year for just $14.95 (12 issues in all). If not, simply write cancel on the bill, return it, and owe nothing.

First Name
Last Name
Address
Country
U.S. Canada Other

City
State/Province
Postal/ Zip Code
Email