National Fisherman

The Rudderpost 

jesJes Hathaway is the editor in chief of National Fisherman magazine and NationalFisherman.com.

 

Once again, an environmental group is using numbers from a study to push fishermen out of the water, while ignoring reports from fishermen that the waters are teeming.

So far this year, reports from the Atlantic bluefin season are consistent in one thing: It is gangbusters out there.

The commercial fleet in Prince Edward Island caught their annual quota in two days. Recreational fishermen in the Mid-Atlantic are saying it's more robust than ever.

And yet, the Center for Biological Diversity continues to insist on an Endangered Species Act listing to protect bluefin tuna from American fishermen.

The group claims the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico devastated the already dwindling population of bluefin during their spawning season.

This may indeed be true, but we don't know for sure. What we do know is that the "numbers" have indicated a long-term spawning problem, but the anecdotes from the people on the water contradict those studies.

Unfortunately, some groups would rather follow the precautionary approach to save the animals rather than to save the jobs.

According to CBD attorney Catherine Kilduff, as quoted in the Ocean City, Md., Dispatch, "The federal government could have predicted the effects of the spill during spawning season prior to the disaster. Listing Atlantic bluefin tuna as endangered will prevent such an oversight from ever happening again."

This sounds like the plan going forward ought to be that we assume there will be scientific studies, presume they will herald disaster and act on those assumptions before bothering to perform the study.

My preference would be for more collaborative research that incorporates the honed skills of professional researchers and scientists with generations of local knowledge you can only find in commercial fishing communities.

People think fishermen are eager to catch the last fish and are not capable of being the stewards of their fishery. It's an uphill battle, but we have to prove them wrong.

Let's work together, get as close as we can to the truth, and move forward from there.

For more on this debate, check out our upcoming December issue.

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 3/10/15

In this episode, Online Editor Leslie Taylor talks with Mike McLouglin, vice president of Dunlop Industrial and Protective Footwear.

National Fisherman Live: 2/24/15

In this episode:

March date set for disaster aid dispersal
Oregon LNG project could disrupt fishing
NOAA tweaks gear marking requirement
N.C. launches first commercial/recreational dock
Spiny lobster traps limits not well received

Inside the Industry

The Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council has scheduled a series of scoping hearings to gather public input for a proposed action to protect unmanaged forage species.

The proposed action would consider a prohibition on the development of new, or expansion of existing, directed fisheries on unmanaged forage species in the Mid-Atlantic until adequate scientific information is available to promote ecosystem sustainability.

Read more...

The National Marine Educators Association has partnered with NOAA this year to offer all NMEA 2015 conference attendees an educational session on how free NOAA data can add functionality to navigation systems and maritime apps.

Session topics include nautical charts, tides and currents, seafloor data, buoy networking and weather, among others.

Read more...
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