National Fisherman

The Rudderpost 

jesJes Hathaway is the editor in chief of National Fisherman magazine and


Blogpic Commercial fishermen throughout this country and the world have a lot of reasons to thank the producers and captains of the Discovery Channel's "Deadliest Catch."

I used to think it was just a fun and easy way to give the average person a window into the lives of commercial fishermen: not just the daily dangers they face, but the fear of coming home empty-handed, the extended periods spent away from onshore family, boat and gear repairs, the camaraderie and hazing that go hand in hand with living with your co-workers.

But now fishermen are getting national attention every year with reports of just how deadly their catch is. Everyone likes to quibble about the fact that, say, last year Bering Sea king crabbers didn't have it that bad; it was the Dungeness crabbers of the Pacific Northwest who were in the deadliest segment of the fishing industry.

This year, it's Northeast groundfishermen.

What this means is the American public is curious about fishermen's lives. It means at least some of the press about fishing is not just about disastrous stocks or searching for protection for one species or another, always because of overfishing.

It's not as easy to demonize and dismiss a fisherman as it is a factory trawler. It's easier to dislike a group of people until you get to know someone from that group.

Well, America has gotten to know Sig, Phil, Keith and their cohorts. Salty though they may be, they are people, and they have brought the focus of fishing to a personal level for many Americans.

Thanks, guys. And thanks to all the families out there who send your loved ones out to sea.

Inside the Industry

NMFS has awarded 16 grants totaling more than $2.5 million as part of its Bycatch Reduction Engineering Program.

The program supports the development of technological solutions and changes in fishing practices designed to minimize bycatch and aims to to find creative approaches and strategies for reducing bycatch, seabird interactions, and post-release mortality in federally managed fisheries.


Abe Williams, who was elected to the Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association board last spring, has been selected as the new president as of September.

Williams fishes the F/V Crimson Fury, and is president of Nuna Resources, a nonprofit that supports sustainable resource development in rural Alaska, including fighting for an international solution to issues raised by the proposed Pebble Mine project.

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