National Fisherman


The Rudderpost 

jesJes Hathaway is the editor in chief of National Fisherman magazine and NationalFisherman.com.

 

Organizers of London's 2012 Olympic Games announced this week that they will stick to "demonstrably sustainable" seafood when feeding more than 23,000 athletes and officials during the games.

The host country will include Marine Stewardship Council certification and Marine Conservation Society standards when choosing approximately 90 tons of seafood for what they claim will be a diverse menu — including some farmed species.

While I'd prefer any major event like this to draw attention to the overwhelming benefits of wild seafood, rather than lumping it in with particular farmed species, I do believe it's a decent jumping-off point.

The Marine Stewardship Council has made no bones about its refusal to certify farmed fish. For that, I applaud them. Their label would mean a lot less to me if it were slapped on non-wild fisheries.

Let the Monterey Bay Aquarium and the like take up the cause of aquaculture over recovering and sustainable U.S. fisheries. But let us not forget that where our food comes from is a significant aspect of its nutritional value and its value to our economy.

Trend or not, local and wild foods sustain local economies.

Inside the Industry

Ray Hilborn, a University of Washington professor of aquatic and fishery sciences, recently received the 2016 International Fisheries Science Prize at the World Fisheries Congress in Busan, South Korea.

The award was given to Hilborn by the World Council of Fisheries Societies’ International Fisheries Science Prize Committee in recognition of his 40-year career of “highly diversified research and publication in support of global fisheries science and conservation.”

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Legislators from Connecticut and Massachusetts complained about the current “out-of-date allocation formula” in black sea bass, summer flounder and scup fisheries in a letter to the U.S. Department of Commerce earlier this week.

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