National Fisherman

The Rudderpost 

jesJes Hathaway is the editor in chief of National Fisherman magazine and NationalFisherman.com.

 

As I mentioned a few weeks ago in another Sorting Table entry, things are looking up for the Gulf of Mexico red snapper fishery.

NMFS officials announced this week at the council meeting in New Orleans that overfishing has ended prior to the 2010 deadline. Though the season may remain curtailed at 75 days, the 2010 total allowable catch — to be split between commercial and recreational fishermen, at 51 and 49 percent, respectively — is 6.9 million pounds, up from 5 million this year.

Officials predict an eventual TAC closer to 15 million pounds and progressively longer seasons.

Final word on the season length will come in February. The primary argument for it remaining short is that recreational fishermen caught almost 2 million pounds more than their allotment in 2009.

While I don't think it's fair to wag our fingers at recreational fishermen and blame them alone for overfishing their quota (fishery managers ought to be keeping track to prevent this from happening in the first place). I do think it's reasonable for the commercial sector to continue to ask why their industry is treated so differently than the sport industry.

When commercial fishermen are exceeding their quotas, somebody gets on the ball and figures out a way to cut losses, no holds barred. But if the only result from the recreational snapper fleet fishing nearly 180 percent of their quota is that the season remains the same with an uptick in TAC, then there's something stinky on the dock.

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 3/10/15

In this episode, Online Editor Leslie Taylor talks with Mike McLouglin, vice president of Dunlop Industrial and Protective Footwear.

National Fisherman Live: 2/24/15

In this episode:

March date set for disaster aid dispersal
Oregon LNG project could disrupt fishing
NOAA tweaks gear marking requirement
N.C. launches first commercial/recreational dock
Spiny lobster traps limits not well received

Inside the Industry

Alaska Gov. Bill Walker is required by state statute to appoint someone to the Board of Fisheries by today, Tuesday, May 19. However, his efforts to fill the seat have gone unfulfilled since he took office in January. The seven-member board serves as an in-state fishery management council for fisheries in state waters.

The resignation of Walker’s director of Boards and Commissions, Karen Gillis, fanned the flames of controversy late last week.

Read more...

Keith Decker, president and COO of High Liner Foods, will take over for the outgoing CEO, Harry Demone, who will assume the role as chairman of the board of directors. The Lunenburg, Nova Scotia-based seafood supplier boasts sales in excess of $310 million (American) for the first quarter of the year.

Read more...
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