National Fisherman

The Rudderpost 

jesJes Hathaway is the editor in chief of National Fisherman magazine and NationalFisherman.com.

 

The Maine lobster fishery has gotten a lot of press this summer for heightened tension in several fishing communities.

But the most explosive blow came this week from the U.S. Coast Guard.

Seal Island, near Matinicus (location of a shooting among embattled lobstermen earlier this year), Vinalhaven and Isle au Haut, was used for bombing practice during World War II.

It seems sea urchin divers discovered unexploded ordnance in the form of "several hundred" bombs or shells in island waters, according to the Bangor Daily News.

In response to what the Coast Guard is calling a danger zone, a new safety zone for the area was expanded to include local lobster grounds.

When Rep. Chellie Pingree (D-Maine) met with Coast Guard officials to discuss the ruling, they concurred that the benefits of keeping the fishery open for already-struggling lobstermen outweighed the unknown risk and withdrew the rule.

What surprises me is how long it has taken the Maine Department of Marine Resources — or anyone else, for that matter — to ask the Coast Guard — or anyone in the federal government responsible for errant munitions — to consider removing unexploded bombs from fishing grounds.

(According to the article, "The DMR planned to ask the agency to consider a mitigation plan for the island." That is, no one has asked yet; they're just planning on asking someone to think about it.)

Are we to expect fishermen to avoid the area or risk being blown up because we don't bother to clean up our own messes?

If this is the federal attitude toward water resources, it's no wonder fishermen are losing ground.

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 3/10/15

In this episode, Online Editor Leslie Taylor talks with Mike McLouglin, vice president of Dunlop Industrial and Protective Footwear.

National Fisherman Live: 2/24/15

In this episode:

March date set for disaster aid dispersal
Oregon LNG project could disrupt fishing
NOAA tweaks gear marking requirement
N.C. launches first commercial/recreational dock
Spiny lobster traps limits not well received

Inside the Industry

Today Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) introduced legislation to extend a permanent exemption for incidental runoff from small commercial fishing boats.

Read more...

The National Working Waterfront Network is now accepting abstracts and session proposals for the next National Working Waterfronts & Waterways Symposium, taking place Nov. 16-19 in Tampa, Fla. The deadline is Tax Day, April 15.

Read more...
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