National Fisherman


The Rudderpost 

jesJes Hathaway is the editor in chief of National Fisherman magazine and NationalFisherman.com.

 

It's been about a decade since the big news in seafood consumption was alarmingly high levels of methylmercury in tuna — leading to warnings that children and pregnant women should limit their consumption or eliminate the fish from their diets altogether.

Those warnings have slowly softened over the years, and always in the background were some grumblings about the accuracy of the assessment and whether selenium might counteract the effects of mercury in ocean fish.

Now a study from the University of North Dakota shows that selenium does indeed affect the absorption of methylmercury and, therefore, must be gauged when recommending consumption restrictions.

Also a poll taken at the International Conference on Mercury as a Global Pollutant shows a majority of scientists saying methylmercury contamination in seafood is not a serious health threat.

So what does this mean for consumers of seafood? Well, I can say anecdotally that the damage has been done. It could take decades for tuna's reputation to recover.

That's how it goes in our media frenzy of 24-hour news coverage. The big, breaking story gets coverage to the point of saturation. The corrections to that story, not so much — especially when they come years later.

That's why the beef people sued Oprah. One bad headline can seriously damage your industry for years (they might thank Dr. Atkins and his diet for early release).

But if tuna should get some sort of relief, it would have to be tempered by the fact that Eastern Atlantic bluefin stocks are in peril. My only advice, as it so often is these days, is to buy American.

Inside the Industry

The American Fisheries Society is honoring recently retired Florida Institute of Oceanography director Bill Hogarth with the Carl R. Sullivan Fishery Conservation Award — one of the nation's premier awards in fisheries science - in recognition of his long career and leadership in preserving some of the world's most threatened species, advocating for environmental protections and leading Florida's scientific response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

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The Marine Stewardship Council has appointed Eric Critchlow as the new U.S. Program Director. Critchlow will be based in the MSC US headquarters in Seattle. He is a former vice president of Lusamerica Foods and has over 35 years in the seafood industry.

Read more ...
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