National Fisherman

The Rudderpost 

jesJes Hathaway is the editor in chief of National Fisherman magazine and NationalFisherman.com.

 

After the tragic sinking of the Lady Mary off the New Jersey coast Tuesday morning, the NTSB has announced the agency will be investigating the incident along with the Coast Guard.

Of seven crew members on the scallop boat, only Jose Arias survived. According to the Press of Atlantic City, Arias slept next to his survival suit and put it on as soon as he awoke at 5 a.m. with the feeling that something was wrong on the boat.

The last time he saw the four missing crew members, they were holding their suits as they struggled to right the boat. When Arias entered the water, he got on his back and did his best to float and prevent the chilly Atlantic water from seeping in.

The Coast Guard is reporting that the EPIRB on the Lady Mary was not entered in a federal database, which they say slowed their response time and may have prevented the nearby F/V Kathryn Marie from receiving the vessel's name and location after it heard a mayday at 5 a.m.

We can "what if" until we're blue in the face when accidents happen. But survivors and fellow fishermen first have to ask themselves what they can do to avoid the same tragedy. Sadly, it means you have to take a little of the cowboy — the element that keeps so many of our highliners on the water — out of the industry by making safety a priority.

However, though training and preparedness can bring you home, how can anyone train to know when to let go of the controls? The skipper of the Lady Mary was most likely doing his best to bring his crew home safely. His efforts were no doubt valiant and honorable, and they may have contributed to Arias' survival.

One thing you can do is register your EPIRB online. Consider sleeping next to your survival suit. Put it on at the first sign of trouble. Attend a safety training course, run drills, get a stability check if you can afford one, and most importantly, keep on fishing.

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 10/21/14

In this episode:

North Pacific Council adjusts observer program
Fishermen: bluefin fishing best in 10 years
Catch limit raised for Bristol Bay red king crab
Canadian fishermen fight over lobster size rules
River conference addresses Dead Zone cleanup

National Fisherman Live: 10/7/14

In this episode, National Fisherman Publisher Jerry Fraser talks about the 1929 dragger Vandal.

 

Inside the Industry

NOAA and its fellow Natural Resource Damage Assessment trustees in the Deepwater Horizon oil spill have announced the signing of a formal Record of Decision to implement a gulf restoration plan. The 44 projects, totaling an estimated $627 million, will restore barrier islands, shorelines, dunes, underwater grasses and oyster beds.

Read more...

The Golden Gate Salmon Association will host its 4th Annual Marin County Dinner at Marin Catholic High School, 675 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., Kentfield on Friday, Oct 10, with doors opening at 5:30 p.m.

Read more...

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