National Fisherman

The Rudderpost 

jesJes Hathaway is the editor in chief of National Fisherman magazine and


I gave my husband a copy of the Savoring Maine calendar for Christmas. Each month has a recipe with locally grown (and readily available) ingredients for that time of year. (Kind of a big deal when there's a crust of ice over everything, including Casco Bay.)

January's recipe was Bloody Mary Oysters, but oysters are perfect anytime, and especially Valentine's Day.

We picked up half a dozen each of Glidden Point and Winter Point Maine oysters and decided to do some with a modified Rockefeller recipe, as well. 


Bloody Mary Oysters (slightly modified for our taste from the original)

  • Half dozen of your favorite local oysters, cleaned and opened
  • 1/2 cup tomato juice (we used our store-brand V-8-style blend)
  • 1/4 cup vodka
  • 1 tablespoon horseradish
  • Several generous dashes of Tabasco
  • 1/2 lemon, juiced
  • 1/2 celery stalk, diced fine
  • Diced dilly beans (optional garnish)

Blend all the ingredients except the celery, oysters and optional dilly beans. Put the oysters in a glass or sippable dish, pour Bloody Mary blend over and garnish with celery and dilly beans.

Oysters Rockefeller

  • Half dozen oysters, cleaned and opened (carefully, as you'll be eating from the shells, so watch out for shards!)
  • 1 strip of thick bacon, diced
  • 2 teaspoons fennel, diced fine
  • 2 tablespoons cooked spinach
  • 3 teaspoons bread crumbs
  • 2 teaspoons diced scallions
  • 1 tablespoon parsley
  • sprinkle of cayenne
  • parmesan, shredded (to taste)

Fry the bacon in a pan and use the drippings to sauté the fennel. Add the spinach if you're using raw (we generally use frozen) and cook until wilted. Divide all the ingredients among your half-shells, topping them with the parmesan. Broil until just browned (about seven minutes).

Inside the Industry

NMFS recently released a draft action plan for fish discard and release mortality science, creating a list of actions that they hope can better inform fisheries.

We know that fishermen have to deal with bycatch by discarding or releasing unwanted catch overboard, but there is a data gap regarding how those fish survive.


A new study has identified a set of features common to all ocean ecosystems that provide a visual diagnosis of the health of the underwater environment coastal communities rely on.

Together, the features detail cumulative effects of threats -- such as overfishing, pollution, and invasive species,  allowing responders to act faster to increase ocean resiliency and sustainability.

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