National Fisherman

Each day, our editors scour news outlets from across the nation and the globe to find and share with you the most interesting and most relevant stories about commercial fishing. We update our site each morning with the latest news on regulations, sustainability and market trends — everything you need to make informed decisions about your business.

But we know it's not always possible for those who work at sea to check in with us daily. So each month we compile the 10 most-read online news stories from the past 30 days. Learn what your colleagues are reading and never miss a hot story with this handy list of our best-read content.

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The proposal that would create the world's largest marine reserve is a poor idea whose time, sadly, has likely come.

President Obama wants to expand the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument, so designated by his predecessor, from about 80,000 square miles to upward of 750,000.

Leaders in the U.S. Pacific Territories have spoken out against the plan, which would ban fishing, resource exploration, and other economic activities. So have the chair and co-chair of the Western Pacific Regional Fishery Management Council, among others, as seen in the video below, but I expect their entreaties will fall on deaf ears.

Marine reserves are not inherently bad, but they must be justified by — and measured against — specific conservation objectives. "Greater protections of our beloved ocean," as cited by petitioners in favor of expanding the monument, is not an especially rigorous standard.

Indeed, in this case the precautions offered by a reserve are dubious. Conservationists describe the waters as pristine, which implies that any human activity that has taken place over the years has had no deleterious effect. And you're banning fishing... why?

The impacts on local fishermen as well as our distant water tuna fleet will be real and adverse. Islanders who oppose an expanded monument know very well it will mean economic losses to local fisheries and the stifling of the traditional Pacific Islands fishing culture that has sustained local communities for centuries.

Yet their voices are countered not with data, but with sentiment: "Together we can push for the fullest expansion and the fullest protection of one of America's natural wonders," writes Frances Beinecke of the Natural Resources Defense Council.

George W. Bush erred when his administration fashioned the monument, and Obama has erred in proportion. Unfortunately, the times and the tides are against us.

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Each day, our editors scour news outlets from across the nation and the globe to find and share with you the most interesting and most relevant stories about commercial fishing. We update our site each morning with the latest news on regulations, sustainability and market trends — everything you need to make informed decisions about your business.

But we know it's not always possible for those who work at sea to check in with us daily. So each month we compile the 10 most-read online news stories from the past 30 days. Learn what your colleagues are reading and never miss a hot story with this handy list of our best-read content.

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Zaca--slide1“Zaca” at the Pound Nets

 

The Tilghman Waterman's Museum on 3-mile-long Tilghman Island, Md., is showcasing the artwork of local waterman William E. Cummings. Now 87, Cummings taught himself to paint when he was in his 40s. When it was too rough to go fishing, he would go to the library and take out books on human anatomy or travel to museums in Washington, D.C. 

Cummings paints working watermen: oyster harvesters, pound netters and seine haulers. He saw these watermen becoming obsolete as his tiny island on the Eastern Shore of Chesapeake Bay changed from a working waterfront that was home to dozens of skipjacks to a retirement community. Cummings wanted to capture a way of life that is vanishing, said Hall Kellogg, executive director of the Tilghman Waterman's Museum.

The museum is selling limited edition canvas prints of several of Cummings paintings to support their mission of preserving the heritage of Tilghman Island's waterman community.

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Leave it to my wife Cheryl to dig a good story out of the woodwork. She came home from work one day last summer, exuberant to tell me about a boatbuilder she'd met.


"I think he's a story," she said.

We were having a glass of wine, contemplating what to have for dinner (moose or salmon) when she suggested we drive over to his place not a mile away from where she works. The next day found us touring Delbert Henry's large shop, Hylite Fabrication, nestled in the woods in Butte, Alaska. As we stood there, dwarfed by a 90-foot research vessel and talked with Henry there was no doubt he was a story, but we needed a commercial fishing boat in the picture to fit National Fisherman.

So you can imagine my exuberance when Cheryl came home in the dead of winter to report that he was building two new 33-foot Cordova bowpickers. A few weeks later I found myself back in his shop and ogling two completed hulls, custom built for Jeff Johnson of Peregrine Boats.

The decks and houses had just been added, and as I climbed up ladders, over bulwarks and down into engine rooms, I was taken aback with the workmanship. I have to admit I'm a sucker for clean integral fittings, and the air intakes for the engine room and attention to countless other details were nearly overwhelming.

The cabins were graceful. The entry and shape of the bows blew me away. Appendages at the corners of the sterns captured my curiosity.

Thank goodness I was armed with video gear. For nothing else could encapsulate it all. Henry was amenable to my filming, as was his congenial crew — and the owners. So I made two more visits to the shop to capture progress on the boats.

As the footage started filling a 500-gigabyte external drive, I started color grading, editing, writing the voice-over and dabbing with the music. At the same time I felt a growing apprehension about the footage from the sea trials.

This would be the action in the video and the epilogue of the finished product. I had premonitions of shaky shots from my kayak or a rubber raft as the boat raced past.

Leave it to Cheryl again. The day before I'd scheduled the shoot she'd found a YouTube video featuring another local treasure, Pat Martin and his fantastic aerial photography. On a whim I called him up. We hit it off, and were excited to work together.

So on a calm morning, Martin showed up to work his magic (Not only does he fly the helicopter drone but runs controls for camera angle, exposure, etc.). Cheryl shot stills, and we hopefully captured in the video below the essence of Henry's creativity in aluminum.

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It was the first day of Louisiana's spring shrimp season, with a promise of clear skies and slack winds, and photographer James Loiselle and I were traveling on a sheriff's water patrol boat to better see how the catches of various boats were shaping up.

Along a stretch of bayou in Dulac, James spotted a committee of vultures (yes, that's what a bunch of them all together is called) uncharacteristically perched on the frames of some shrimp boats that had not yet headed out for the harvest.

I say uncharacteristically because there are vultures a-plenty in south Louisiana; they are not, however, seen with regularity at wharves and docks, having plenty of sugarcane fields and forested swamps for socializing and feeding purposes.

vultures1The sight of so many vultures on a boat gave me a quick shiver. And because the vision occurred on the first day of shrimp season, I was a little concerned about the symbolism. Vultures, thanks to their feeding habits, are associated with death after all. And so many have beat the drum for so long about the pending death of the shrimping industry and the bayou country's commercial fishing culture.

There was also the more direct concern about the portent potential, our own voyage and the safety of all those at sea.

James captured the image and I later did research on vultures in mythology and literature, including shamanic interpretations, and did I ever get an education.

The short answer was that yes, vultures are indeed seen as harbingers of death.

But for millennia they have also been seen as close to the gods because they have a tough task to do and get it done without complaining.

In some cultures they are symbols of rebirth and renewal, because their onerous task of scarfing up carrion is necessary to make way for the new, and for purification.

They are the embodiment, I determined after my research, of the phrase "it's a tough job but somebody's gotta do it."

And that, of course, brought my mind square back to the fishermen I have written about for so many years, people who know more than lots of other people how hard work can be, but how rewarding not just financially but also spiritually their labors are, and how so many people on and off their boats benefit from their sacrifices and their determination.

The more I thought of these things the more I realized how appropriate indeed it was for me to see vultures on a shrimp boat frame on the season's first day, and how appropriately those vultures could be seen as a particularly good omen for all those laboring on the water that day.

Photo: A committee of vultures perch atop the net frames of shrimp boats on the opening day of Louisiana's 2014 shrimp season. James Loiselle photo

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Top10MayEach day, our editors scour news outlets from across the nation and the globe to find and share with you the most interesting and most relevant stories about commercial fishing. We update our site each morning with the latest news on regulations, sustainability and market trends  everything you need to make informed decisions about your business.

But we know it's not always possible for those who work at sea to check in with us daily. So here's a handy list of the 10 most-read online news stories from the past 30 days. 

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By Maureen Donald

A major shake-up at the North Carolina Fisheries Association, one of the country's oldest trade associations representing the commercial fishing industry, has resulted in a new leadership team that includes a familiar face.

brentReturning after nearly a decade, 18-year association veteran Jerry Schill, holds the reins again as executive director. Brent Fulcher of B&J Seafood in New Bern and Beaufort Inlet Seafood in Beaufort, is the newly elected chairman of the association's board of directors.
According to Fulcher, seen at left, the timing is right for a revamped, revitalized association.

"There's a new energy evident within the industry," says Fulcher, seen at left. "People are realizing that we must work together in order to effectively influence our future. It's time for our industry to act as one, not as separate self-absorbed components."

jerrySchill, pictured at right, has broad experience on both the local, state and federal levels and says he is ready to get started — again.

"I sense a very different attitude in the industry today," Schill says. "Folks are ready to be participants and take an active part in the process, not simply sit back and complain about it."

"With Jerry's past experience I have no doubt this organization will be a strong voice for the seafood industry in North Carolina," Fulcher says. "We have made progress this past year with issues regarding the game fish bill and shrimp trawling. People want to keep that momentum going."

After a two-year absence, the association newspaper, Tradewinds, also underwent a transformation and began publishing again in April.

Photos: Brent Fulcher, chairman of the board of directors, and Jerry Schill, executive director, N.C. Fisheries Association; N.C. Fisheries Association

 

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By Leslie Taylor, National Fisherman Online Editor

As I'm relatively new to the commercial fishing beat, my visit a couple of weeks ago to the Portland Fish Exchange, the nation's first seafood display auction, was eye-opening for me. I had never really thought much before about the mechanics of the process that takes a fish from the hands of the fisherman who caught it to my grocery counter. 

I was at the Portland Fish Exchange in Portland, Maine, to shoot a video with National Fisherman Publisher Jerry Fraser about the advantages of fish as a protein option, particularly with the rising costs of beef and poultry. The video is embedded below.

The Casco Bay was shrouded in fog when we arrived at the Portland Fish Exchange at around seven in the morning to meet Bert Jongerden, general manager of the exchange. Because Jongerden has been general manager of the exchange since 2007, and also worked there from 1990-1996 as an operations manager, he has, as he said, "seen the rise and fall of our groundfish." He's seen groundfish landings go from 30 million pounds per year to about 5 million pounds per year. 

05.08.14 fishexchangeAs the fog burned off, we did some filming and Jerry and I chatted with the exchange employees smoking on the pier, waiting for the arrival of the fishing vessel Robert Michael. Approximately 70 fishing vessels sell their catch via the Portland Fish Exchange and what makes this market unique is that it's an all display auction. Seafood buyers don't just bid generically on fish, they can bid on a specific load of fish. So fisherman can get a higher price for fish that are in the best condition.

Using a block and tackle, the guys hoisted large blue buckets filled with pollock, redfish, cod and hake from the hold of the Robert Michael and dumped them down a chute into the sorting facility. The fish first landed in a basin where excess water could drain, then were pulled up a conveyer belt towards a team of Grundens-clad employees who culled the fish by type, quality and size.

05.08.14 fishexchangeThe fish were sorted into plastic tubs and iced. One employee manned the computer station, using what looked like a price gun you might see at a checkout counter to scan the barcode associated with each fish size and quality, then printed out labels for the tubs.

The tubs of fish were then whisked by forklift to the floor of the exchange's giant refrigerated warehouse, where they could be examined by buyers in anticipation of the day's auction. Auctions are held at 11:00 a.m. Sunday through Thursday and there are about 20 buyers who are quite active participants, Jongerden explained. 

The auction is now entirely run via computer. When groundfish were being hauled in at the rate of 30 million a year, a lot of companies would have a fish buyer based in Portland full time. But the reduction in landings has meant that most purchases are now done remotely.

It's a reverse clock auction, which begins with a relatively high asking price that is lowered until some participant is willing to buy. Buyers login to the Portland Fish Exchange auction system through a VPN connection and they begin bidding by depressing the space bar on their keyboard. The last person to pick their finger off the space bar will win the bid. 

What struck me was how much the whole process of conveying a fish from the sea to the plate of someone who did not catch it has changed with the implementation of new technologies. While it is a transaction that must have been a part of coastal communities since the dawn of civilization, VPN lines and pricing guns have made it a whole new ballgame. 

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Each day, our editors scour news outlets from across the nation and the globe to find and share with you the most interesting and most relevant stories about commercial fishing. We update our site each morning with the latest news on regulations, sustainability and market trends  everything you need to make informed decisions about your business.

But we know it's not always possible for those who work at sea to check in with us daily. So here's a handy list of the 10 most-read online news stories from the past 30 days. 

Add a comment

Read more...

Page 2 of 4

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 12/16/14

In this episode, Bruce Buls, WorkBoat's technical editor, interviews Long Island lobsterman John Aldridge, who survived for 12 hours after falling overboard in the dead of night. Aldridge was the keynote speaker at the 2014 Pacific Marine Expo, which took place Nov. 19-21 in Seattle.

Inside the Industry

NOAA, in consultation with the Department of the Interior, has appointed 10 new members to the Marine Protected Areas Federal Advisory Committee. The 20-member committee is composed of individuals with diverse backgrounds and experience who advise the departments of commerce and the interior on ways to strengthen and connect the nation's MPA programs. The new members join the 10 continuing members appointed in 2012.

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Fishermen in Western Australia captured astonishing footage this week as a five-meter-long great white shark tried to steal their catch, ramming into the side of their boat.
 
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