National Fisherman

Mixed Catch 

lincIn Mixed Catch, NF Senior Editor Linc Bedrosian spotlights a wide range of commercial fishing-related news items from coast to coast.

 

The first in a series of nationwide public workshops to discuss revisions to the Magnuson-Stevens Act is taking place today, Tuesday, Feb. 11 at Seattle's Renaissance Hotel. And if anyone asks you why the act that governs U.S. fishery management requires tweaking, tell them they need look no further than a report examining the economic performance of Northeast groundfish vessels in 2012.

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One of the perks of being on the NF staff is that you get to be among the first to read great monthly submissions like Roger Fitzgerald's "In Search of the Simple Life" column. Fitz's column is always a treat to read.

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Don't look now, but it's not too early to start thinking about Valentine's Day presents. And if you have a lobster lover in your life, I have a gift idea to pass your way. Think about getting them the 2014 Lobstermen's Calendar, entitled "Heroes of the Sea."

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For a long time, old lobster traps have found a second life as household furniture. People take old wooden lobster traps and turn them into coffee tables. This weekend, I came upon another twist on the idea.

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Congress unveiled a $1.012 trillion spending bill yesterday that will fund the government until October and contains $75 million in disaster mitigation funding for commercial fishery failures and fishery resource disasters in 2012 and 2013. Given the inability of Congress to do much of anything constructive this year, it's amazing that the $75 million is included.

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currentIf you love boats that go fast — and you know you do — you're going to love our February cover story on New Jersey's garvey boat racers. Field editor Kirk Moore's story, which begins on page 18, gives us the low down on how the classic southern New Jersey bayman's snub-nosed wooden workboats, whose roots stretch back to the 1700s, have been transformed into fiberglass racing rockets.

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Selling your catch directly to the public may not be a new concept, but fishermen are increasingly taking advantage of social media, the Internet and technology to take the practice to a new level. For example, we took a look in our November 2013 issue at how Louisiana fishermen are using tools like Facebook and Louisiana Sea Grant's umbrella website, Louisiana Direct Seafood, to sell their catch.

And in our September 2013 issue, we told you about how Half Moon Bay, Calif.-based Phondini Partners was expanding its FishLine app, which connects seafood lovers with fishermen and restaurants that have fresh fish available, to include more California ports. Now the FishLine folks have created a video that shows consumers how they can buy Dungeness crab fresh off the boat.

The video shows buyers how the crabs are caught, and what it's like to come down to the docks to pick up some Dungies to cure their crab cravings. And of course it touts the benefits of either downloading the free FishLine mobile app or using the FishLine web page.

It's a good looking video. But what is most appealing to me is that fishermen can take advantage of increasingly affordable technology to produce pieces like this. Whether you use something as slick as a GoPro video camera or as simple as a smartphone, you can shoot, edit and upload to the Web videos that can help you connect with consumers on many levels.

Yes, such pieces can help you sell your product. But they can also help you build a relationship with consumers; you can show them what you do for a living and how and why you do it. And in the process, they help the people who supply the nation with delicious seafood become the brand.

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We like a big, fat Christmas tree in our household. If it won't scrape the edges of the sliding door in the kitchen or tickle the family room ceiling, we don't want it.

However impressive and grand we think our tree may be, I'm afraid it pales in comparison to one in Rockland, Maine, home of the World's Largest Lobster Trap Tree, which stands 35 feet tall. This year marks the 10th anniversary of the Trap Tree tradition.

Every year since 2003, Rockland Main Street Inc. has built the Trap Tree. Rockland Maine Street Inc., one of 10 Main Street Communities in Maine, is part of a national program that aims to sustain vibrant downtowns through historic preservation, economic restructuring, promotion, design and organization.

According to the organization's website, each year, volunteers build the Trap Tree using 152 traps that Brooks Trap Mill in Thomaston, Maine, constructs especially for Rockland Main Street, each one weighing 40 pounds. A special engineering plan enables them to build the tree to its lofty height.

They decorate the big fella, too. It's festooned with 480 feet of garland and 125 buoys that local lobstering families brought to decorate the first Trap Tree in 2003. The tree is lighted from the inside and twinkle lights wind through the garland.

And what do you use to top a 35-foot Trap Tree? A 5-foot fiberglass lobster, that's what.

The tree even comes with a present for some lucky lobsterman. Raffle tickets are sold for $50 each, with the winner receiving 100 of the traps used to build the tree.

But to me, the most impressive thing about the tree is not its size. It's the fact that the Rockland organization chooses to build a tree to salute its lobstermen. I'll raise a glass of eggnog to the idea of celebrating our nation's fishing communities, and I hope you will, too.

While you're at it, watch the volunteers build this year's tree in the RCN America Network video below. And whether your tree is tall or small, have yourselves a merry little Christmas.

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Fishermen can be superstitious. For example, they won't leave port on the 13th of any month. Nor do they set sail on a Friday. To do so would be to court disaster. And leaving on Friday the 13th? That would be tempting fate.

However, the three-man crew of the 58-foot Endorphin was already eight days into a fishing trip last week when trouble struck on — yep — Friday the 13th. The boat was heading back to Montauk, N.Y., that day when the boat's main engine died and the crew lost their generator to boot. Crew member Christopher Fallon told Long Island Newsday that they were without the generator, lights, food or heat for about 24 hours.

Fortunately, the crew's luck that day eventually changed. A nearby good Samaritan vessel arrived on the scene, and was able to keep Endorphin in contact with the Coast Guard. However, the good Samaritan boat couldn't tow Endorphin to safety because of the weather conditions; reportedly seas that afternoon were 8 to 13 feet with winds of 35 knots.

But a Coast Guard aircraft was able to drop supplies, including food, water, and a handheld radio to Endorphin, now stranded some 86 miles southeast of Montauk as seen in this brief Coast Guard video shot by Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Jetta Disco on the Coast Guard Cutter Tahoma.

Happily, Tahoma, which arrived late Friday night, was able to start towing Endorphin home; a rescue boat from the Montauk Coast Guard station relieved the Maine-based cutter upon arriving at Montauk Inlet. The rescue boat brought Endorphin and her crew safely to port ahead of Saturday's storm.

It may be awhile before Endorphin gets to go out again. Vessel owner Robert Fallon, Christopher's father, told Newsday the boat's engine must be rebuilt this winter. But when Endorphin does head out again, what are the odds that it will do so on a  Friday?

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Here we are midway through December and the holiday season is in full swing. It's easy to get cynical about the rampant commercialism surrounding Christmas. But leave it to the commercial fishing industry to remind us it's the season of giving.

According to KTOO-AM radio in Alaska, SeaShare, a Seattle-based non-profit group that works with the seafood industry to deliver fish to soup kitchens and shelters nationwide, has donated 18,000 pounds of individually wrapped chum salmon steaks to the Glory Hole, a Juneau soup kitchen and shelter. The 2011 SeaShare video below shows how donated salmon are cut into steaks and individually wrapped for eventual delivery to the food banks.

The fish being donated to the soup kitchen is chum bycatch from the Bering Sea pollock trawl fishery. And while the pollock fleet has worked to reduce salmon bycatch substantially, it's been a sore subject in Western Alaska especially where king salmon runs are low.

But let's focus on the food bank donation, which is a great thing. Of the 18,000 pounds of salmon donated, Glory Hole will keep 3,000 pounds and will help distribute the rest to more than 10 other organizations, including the Juneau-based Southeast Alaska Food Bank, which will receive 5,000 pounds.

"That's a very generous donation," Southeast Alaska Food Bank manager Darren Adams told KTOO. "We can always use an influx of protein. We tend to get a lot of empty calories but it's always nice to get stuff like salmon and other meats that allow us to offer something healthy to our clients."

It's good to hear that bycatch is being utilized to feed people who really need it. It puts bycatch to good use rather than wasting the fish and dumping it overboard.

What would really be great would be if as part of the Magnuson-Stevens Act reauthorization a provision was added that called for all bycatch to be donated and distributed to local food banks. That would truly be a gift that keeps on giving.

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Page 5 of 29

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 10/21/14

In this episode:

North Pacific Council adjusts observer program
Fishermen: bluefin fishing best in 10 years
Catch limit raised for Bristol Bay red king crab
Canadian fishermen fight over lobster size rules
River conference addresses Dead Zone cleanup

National Fisherman Live: 10/7/14

In this episode, National Fisherman Publisher Jerry Fraser talks about the 1929 dragger Vandal.

 

Inside the Industry

NOAA and its fellow Natural Resource Damage Assessment trustees in the Deepwater Horizon oil spill have announced the signing of a formal Record of Decision to implement a gulf restoration plan. The 44 projects, totaling an estimated $627 million, will restore barrier islands, shorelines, dunes, underwater grasses and oyster beds.

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The Golden Gate Salmon Association will host its 4th Annual Marin County Dinner at Marin Catholic High School, 675 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., Kentfield on Friday, Oct 10, with doors opening at 5:30 p.m.

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