National Fisherman

Mixed Catch 

lincIn Mixed Catch, NF Senior Editor Linc Bedrosian spotlights a wide range of commercial fishing-related news items from coast to coast.

Last week, my lovely bride and a few of her work colleagues piled into her large white Buick and drove directly into the teeth of a monster snowstorm, determined to reach a business conference in Charlotte, N.C. Some 23 hours of white-knuckle driving through all manner of frozen precipitation didn't keep my fisherman's daughter spouse — a force of nature in her own right — from arriving on time.

Add a comment

Read more...

 

The first in a series of nationwide public workshops to discuss revisions to the Magnuson-Stevens Act is taking place today, Tuesday, Feb. 11 at Seattle's Renaissance Hotel. And if anyone asks you why the act that governs U.S. fishery management requires tweaking, tell them they need look no further than a report examining the economic performance of Northeast groundfish vessels in 2012.

Add a comment

Read more...

One of the perks of being on the NF staff is that you get to be among the first to read great monthly submissions like Roger Fitzgerald's "In Search of the Simple Life" column. Fitz's column is always a treat to read.

Add a comment

Read more...

Don't look now, but it's not too early to start thinking about Valentine's Day presents. And if you have a lobster lover in your life, I have a gift idea to pass your way. Think about getting them the 2014 Lobstermen's Calendar, entitled "Heroes of the Sea."

Add a comment

Read more...

For a long time, old lobster traps have found a second life as household furniture. People take old wooden lobster traps and turn them into coffee tables. This weekend, I came upon another twist on the idea.

Add a comment

Read more...

Congress unveiled a $1.012 trillion spending bill yesterday that will fund the government until October and contains $75 million in disaster mitigation funding for commercial fishery failures and fishery resource disasters in 2012 and 2013. Given the inability of Congress to do much of anything constructive this year, it's amazing that the $75 million is included.

Add a comment

Read more...

 

currentIf you love boats that go fast — and you know you do — you're going to love our February cover story on New Jersey's garvey boat racers. Field editor Kirk Moore's story, which begins on page 18, gives us the low down on how the classic southern New Jersey bayman's snub-nosed wooden workboats, whose roots stretch back to the 1700s, have been transformed into fiberglass racing rockets.

Add a comment

Read more...

Selling your catch directly to the public may not be a new concept, but fishermen are increasingly taking advantage of social media, the Internet and technology to take the practice to a new level. For example, we took a look in our November 2013 issue at how Louisiana fishermen are using tools like Facebook and Louisiana Sea Grant's umbrella website, Louisiana Direct Seafood, to sell their catch.

And in our September 2013 issue, we told you about how Half Moon Bay, Calif.-based Phondini Partners was expanding its FishLine app, which connects seafood lovers with fishermen and restaurants that have fresh fish available, to include more California ports. Now the FishLine folks have created a video that shows consumers how they can buy Dungeness crab fresh off the boat.

The video shows buyers how the crabs are caught, and what it's like to come down to the docks to pick up some Dungies to cure their crab cravings. And of course it touts the benefits of either downloading the free FishLine mobile app or using the FishLine web page.

It's a good looking video. But what is most appealing to me is that fishermen can take advantage of increasingly affordable technology to produce pieces like this. Whether you use something as slick as a GoPro video camera or as simple as a smartphone, you can shoot, edit and upload to the Web videos that can help you connect with consumers on many levels.

Yes, such pieces can help you sell your product. But they can also help you build a relationship with consumers; you can show them what you do for a living and how and why you do it. And in the process, they help the people who supply the nation with delicious seafood become the brand.

Add a comment

We like a big, fat Christmas tree in our household. If it won't scrape the edges of the sliding door in the kitchen or tickle the family room ceiling, we don't want it.

However impressive and grand we think our tree may be, I'm afraid it pales in comparison to one in Rockland, Maine, home of the World's Largest Lobster Trap Tree, which stands 35 feet tall. This year marks the 10th anniversary of the Trap Tree tradition.

Every year since 2003, Rockland Main Street Inc. has built the Trap Tree. Rockland Maine Street Inc., one of 10 Main Street Communities in Maine, is part of a national program that aims to sustain vibrant downtowns through historic preservation, economic restructuring, promotion, design and organization.

According to the organization's website, each year, volunteers build the Trap Tree using 152 traps that Brooks Trap Mill in Thomaston, Maine, constructs especially for Rockland Main Street, each one weighing 40 pounds. A special engineering plan enables them to build the tree to its lofty height.

They decorate the big fella, too. It's festooned with 480 feet of garland and 125 buoys that local lobstering families brought to decorate the first Trap Tree in 2003. The tree is lighted from the inside and twinkle lights wind through the garland.

And what do you use to top a 35-foot Trap Tree? A 5-foot fiberglass lobster, that's what.

The tree even comes with a present for some lucky lobsterman. Raffle tickets are sold for $50 each, with the winner receiving 100 of the traps used to build the tree.

But to me, the most impressive thing about the tree is not its size. It's the fact that the Rockland organization chooses to build a tree to salute its lobstermen. I'll raise a glass of eggnog to the idea of celebrating our nation's fishing communities, and I hope you will, too.

While you're at it, watch the volunteers build this year's tree in the RCN America Network video below. And whether your tree is tall or small, have yourselves a merry little Christmas.

Add a comment

Fishermen can be superstitious. For example, they won't leave port on the 13th of any month. Nor do they set sail on a Friday. To do so would be to court disaster. And leaving on Friday the 13th? That would be tempting fate.

However, the three-man crew of the 58-foot Endorphin was already eight days into a fishing trip last week when trouble struck on — yep — Friday the 13th. The boat was heading back to Montauk, N.Y., that day when the boat's main engine died and the crew lost their generator to boot. Crew member Christopher Fallon told Long Island Newsday that they were without the generator, lights, food or heat for about 24 hours.

Fortunately, the crew's luck that day eventually changed. A nearby good Samaritan vessel arrived on the scene, and was able to keep Endorphin in contact with the Coast Guard. However, the good Samaritan boat couldn't tow Endorphin to safety because of the weather conditions; reportedly seas that afternoon were 8 to 13 feet with winds of 35 knots.

But a Coast Guard aircraft was able to drop supplies, including food, water, and a handheld radio to Endorphin, now stranded some 86 miles southeast of Montauk as seen in this brief Coast Guard video shot by Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Jetta Disco on the Coast Guard Cutter Tahoma.

Happily, Tahoma, which arrived late Friday night, was able to start towing Endorphin home; a rescue boat from the Montauk Coast Guard station relieved the Maine-based cutter upon arriving at Montauk Inlet. The rescue boat brought Endorphin and her crew safely to port ahead of Saturday's storm.

It may be awhile before Endorphin gets to go out again. Vessel owner Robert Fallon, Christopher's father, told Newsday the boat's engine must be rebuilt this winter. But when Endorphin does head out again, what are the odds that it will do so on a  Friday?

Add a comment

Page 2 of 26

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 4/22/14

  • OSU study targets commercial fishing injuries
  • Delaware's native mud crab making recovery
  • Alaska salmon catch projected to drop 47 percent
  • West Coast groundfish fishery bill passes
  • Maine's scallop season strongest in years

Brian Rothschild of the Center for Sustainable Fisheries on revisions to the Magnuson-Stevens Act.

Inside the Industry

The South Atlantic Fishery Management Council is currently soliciting applicants for open advisory panel seats as well as applications from scientists interested in serving on its Scientific and Statistical Committee.

Read more...

The North Carolina Fisheries Association (NCFA), a nonprofit trade association representing commercial fishermen, seafood dealers and processors, recently announced a new leadership team. Incorporated in 1952, its administrative office is in Bayboro, N.C.

Read more...

Try a FREE issue of National Fisherman

Fill out this order form, If you like the magazine, get the rest of the year for just $14.95 (12 issues in all). If not, simply write cancel on the bill, return it, and owe nothing.

First Name
Last Name
Address
Country
U.S. Canada Other

City
State/Province
Postal/ Zip Code
Email