National Fisherman


Mixed Catch 

jerryJerry Fraser is NF's publisher and former editor.

 

 

Top 5 Mixed Catch Stories

For years, fish has been called "brain food" because eating it makes you smarter. And given the variety of health benefits protein-and omega-3-rich seafood offers, people are indeed smart to make fish a regular part of their diet.

But a study presented at the Radiological Society of North America annual meeting, held recently in Chicago, indicates that eating baked or broiled fish may benefit your brain in another important way.

The paper, authored by researchers from the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and the university's School of Medicine, is entitled, "Regular Fish Consumption Is Associated With Larger Gray Matter Volumes and Reduced Risk for Cognitive Decline in the Cardiovascular Health Study."

Catchy title, no?

The study says that people who eat baked or broiled fish weekly may be making their brain healthier and reducing their risk of developing mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

Wait, what about fried seafood? To be sure, it's tasty. But, according to the study, it doesn't offer the same protection against cognitive decline.

It's estimated that as many as 5.1 million Americans may have Alzheimer's disease. The incurable, progressive brain disease slowly destroys memory and other cognitive skills.

According to a radiology society press release, out of the 260 cognitively normal individuals selected for the study, 163 consumed fish weekly, and most did so one to four times a week. 3-D volumetric MRIs of the brain, and a brain mapping technique that measures gray matter volume enabled researchers to examine the relationship between weekly fish consumption and brain structure 10 years later.

Researchers say that gray matter volume is vital to brain health; the more you can pump up the volume, the better off your brain is.

The study found that eating baked or broiled fish weekly was positively associated with greater gray matter volume in several important regions of the brain. Consequently, the study says, fish eaters reduced their risk for five-year decline to MCI or Alzheimer's by almost five-fold.

Keeping a cruel disease like Alzheimer's at bay sounds like an awfully good reason for folks to up their fish consumption and dine on baked or broiled seafood once a week, if not more.

Inside the Industry

NOAA recently published a proposed rule that would implement a traceability plan to help combat IUU fishing. The program would seek to trace the origins of imported seafood by setting up reporting and filing procedures for products entering the U.S.

The traceability program would collect data on harvest, landing, and chain of custody of fish and fish products that have been identified as particularly vulnerable to IUU fishing and fraud.

Read more...

The following was released by the Maine Department of Marine Resources on Jan. 22:

The Maine Department of Marine Resources announced an emergency regulation that will support the continued rebuilding effort in Maine’s scallop fishery. The rule, effective January 23, 2016, will close the Muscle Ridge Area near South Thomaston and the Western Penobscot Bay Area.

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