National Fisherman

Consider the New England Fishery Management Council's decision this week to recommend cutting northeast cod harvests for the upcoming 2012 fishery by 15 to 20 percent another good reason for fishermen to attend the Wednesday, March 21 "Keep Fishermen Fishing" rally in Washington, D.C.

That would represent a cut of between 6,700 and 7,500 metric tons from the already conservative 2011 total. How many businesses could withstand a 15 to 20 percent drop in their production?

And yet, the cut isn't as bad as it could've been. Given the dire (and controversial) 2011 cod stock assessments, it could've been as much as a 90 percent slash, which would have been disastrous for the groundfish industry. So while a 15 to 20 percent harvest cut hurts, it at least allows the fishery to continue for a year while fishermen and managers alike try to figure out a way out of the regulatory mess that managing groundfish has become.

For more than 15 years, cod has been sore spot in what has largely been a successful effort to rebuild the region's groundfish stocks. But since the cod population hasn't reached levels NMFS says is needed for the stock to be considered healthy and sustainable by 2014, as mandated by the Magnuson-Stevens Act, the groundfish fleet's future is in jeopardy.

The arbitrary 10-year rebuilding timeline set forth in Magnuson-Stevens is the problem. And the fishermen's rally in the nation's capitol is a prime opportunity to broadcast the need for Congress to support legislation that aims to amend Magnuson and give the federal fisheries management law greater flexibility.

To learn more about the rally and bus transportation to Washington, D.C., visit the Keep Fishermen Fishing website www.keepfishermenfishing.com or call (888) 564-6732.

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 3/10/15

In this episode, Online Editor Leslie Taylor talks with Mike McLouglin, vice president of Dunlop Industrial and Protective Footwear.

National Fisherman Live: 2/24/15

In this episode:

March date set for disaster aid dispersal
Oregon LNG project could disrupt fishing
NOAA tweaks gear marking requirement
N.C. launches first commercial/recreational dock
Spiny lobster traps limits not well received

Inside the Industry

Alaska Gov. Bill Walker is required by state statute to appoint someone to the Board of Fisheries by today, Tuesday, May 19. However, his efforts to fill the seat have gone unfulfilled since he took office in January. The seven-member board serves as an in-state fishery management council for fisheries in state waters.

The resignation of Walker’s director of Boards and Commissions, Karen Gillis, fanned the flames of controversy late last week.

Read more...

Keith Decker, president and COO of High Liner Foods, will take over for the outgoing CEO, Harry Demone, who will assume the role as chairman of the board of directors. The Lunenburg, Nova Scotia-based seafood supplier boasts sales in excess of $310 million (American) for the first quarter of the year.

Read more...
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