National Fisherman

Two years down the road, how do we measure the impact of the massive Deepwater Horizon oil spill upon Gulf of Mexico commercial fishermen?



Well, for one thing, the fact that we're still talking about the 2010 spill indicates the region is still recovering. Here's a sampling of spill-related stories we've seen in the week leading up to Friday's unhappy anniversary:



• The FDA says consumers shouldn't be alarmed by photos of Gulf of Mexico finfish bearing sores and lesions. Diseased fish aren't allowed to be sold, the agency says, and the percentage of diseased fish found is low. Furthermore, testing by state laboratories of more than 10,000 fish and shellfish for traces of certain chemicals found in oil occurred before commercial fishing was ever allowed to resume, the agency says, and the testing showed levels are far below amounts that could make anyone sick.



• Still, a recent study conducted by Wes Harrison, a Louisiana State University professor of agribusiness marketing, reveals that 70 percent of people in the United States remain wary about the region's seafood, and 30 percent nationally say they won't eat gulf seafood because of the spill. Consequently, a nationwide Gulf of Mexico seafood marketing effort will strive to dispel those negative consumer perceptions. BP is donating $50 million for the campaign.



• The Justice Department has announced that more Gulf Coast residents harmed by the spill but whose claims with BP's compensation fund were wrongfully denied will receive more than $63 million in additional payments.



• A federal judge is pondering a proposed class-action settlement plan crafted by BP and lawyers representing more than 100,000 people and business that aims to resolve billions of dollars in spill-related claims.



The stories offer a glimpse of the oil spill's impact upon commercial fishing in the gulf. But even two years after the explosion of the Deepwater Horizon well, which claimed the lives of 11 oil rig workers, we still don't know the extent of the damage to the marine environment and its fishy inhabitants, nor how long it will take the region's fish and fishermen to be made whole. We can only hope it will be soon.

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 3/10/15

In this episode, Online Editor Leslie Taylor talks with Mike McLouglin, vice president of Dunlop Industrial and Protective Footwear.

National Fisherman Live: 2/24/15

In this episode:

March date set for disaster aid dispersal
Oregon LNG project could disrupt fishing
NOAA tweaks gear marking requirement
N.C. launches first commercial/recreational dock
Spiny lobster traps limits not well received

Inside the Industry

Alaska Gov. Bill Walker is required by state statute to appoint someone to the Board of Fisheries by today, Tuesday, May 19. However, his efforts to fill the seat have gone unfulfilled since he took office in January. The seven-member board serves as an in-state fishery management council for fisheries in state waters.

The resignation of Walker’s director of Boards and Commissions, Karen Gillis, fanned the flames of controversy late last week.

Read more...

Keith Decker, president and COO of High Liner Foods, will take over for the outgoing CEO, Harry Demone, who will assume the role as chairman of the board of directors. The Lunenburg, Nova Scotia-based seafood supplier boasts sales in excess of $310 million (American) for the first quarter of the year.

Read more...
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