National Fisherman

Mixed Catch 

jerryJerry Fraser is NF's publisher and former editor.

 

 

Top 5 Mixed Catch Stories

The fishermen who attended Tuesday's public workshop in Baton Rouge, La., to talk about reauthorizing the Magnuson-Stevens Act had already had a long day. Many if not all of the approximately 40 folks who came to the session had already attended the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council meeting, also held at the Embassy Suites hotel.

And yet they chose to stay for the Magnuson-Stevens session, the third in the series of workshops co-sponsored by the New Bedford-based Center for Sustainable Fisheries and NF. Previous sessions took place in Seattle and Boston. They came to learn more about the proposals being developed and most importantly, add their thoughts on what was important to fishermen in their region.


Bob GillBrian Rothschild, the center's president and CEO, then led the informal discussion with the Southern fishermen. He offered a checklist of issues and problems to consider when developing ideas for revising the nation's federal fishing law.

Among those issues was the idea of rewriting the act's National Standards. Rothschild discussed the idea of changing National Standard 1 from focusing primarily on preventing overfishing and secondarily obtaining optimum yield to focusing on maximizing yield or an economic function of yield, subject to constraints on fishing mortality as determined by the management council. The idea is to strengthen the economic component of fisheries management, give the councils more flexibility and facilite better science.

Some fishermen at the session were concerned about the proposal. They noted that in many ways, red snapper has been a success story — and part of that success has come by putting the fish first, creating dependability in the IFQ fishery. In their eyes, anything that diminishes that success would be bad.

The idea of giving the councils more say in setting catch limits gave other fishermen pause. They say the gulf council already sorely lacks commercial sector representation. Giving more power to the most political side of the management process didn't strike them as a good idea.

But there was agreement on other issues, like the need for more and better stock assessments, and allowing longer stock rebuilding time periods. Fishermen recognized that there are problems they experience that fishermen across the country experience, too. And that makes talking about them very worthwhile, especially if it will result in positive change for the nation's fishermen.

I got to kick off the session with brief remarks as NF's representative, then handed the reins to Kate Kramer the center's chief operating officer. Gulf council member Harlon Pearce of Harlon's LA Fish and Bob Gill, owner of Shrimp Landing Seafood, both members of the Gulf Seafood Institute's board of directors addressed the audience as well. Audience members told me afterward they appreciated the workshop being held there, and I heard yesterday that others commented that they found the discussion fruitful, too.

Comments, suggestions and ideas from all three public sessions are being compiled for a final workshop to be held at a date to be determined in Washington, D.C. If you're interested in learning more about the workshop results and where commonalities exist, contact Kate Kramer, the center's chief operating officer.

 

Photo: Bob Gill of the Gulf Seafood Institute addresses fishermen attending the Magnuson-Stevens reauthorization workshop. Linc Bedrosian photo

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 3/10/15

In this episode, Online Editor Leslie Taylor talks with Mike McLouglin, vice president of Dunlop Industrial and Protective Footwear.

National Fisherman Live: 2/24/15

In this episode:

March date set for disaster aid dispersal
Oregon LNG project could disrupt fishing
NOAA tweaks gear marking requirement
N.C. launches first commercial/recreational dock
Spiny lobster traps limits not well received

Inside the Industry

SeaShare, a non-profit organization that facilitates donations of seafood to feed the hungry, announced on Wednesday, July 29 that it had partnered up with Alaska seafood companies, freight companies and the Coast Guard, to coordinate the donation and delivery of 21,000 pounds of halibut to remote villages in western Alaska. 

On Wednesday, the Coast Guard loaded 21,000 pounds of donated halibut on its C130 airplane in Kodiak and made the 634-mile flight to Nome.

Read more...

The New England Fishery Management Council  is soliciting applications for seats on the Northeast Trawl Survey Advisory Panel and the deadline to apply is July 31 at 5:00 p.m.

The panel will consist of 16 members including members of the councils and the Atlantic States Fishery Commission, industry experts, non-federal scientists and Northeast Fisheries Science Center scientists. Panel members are expected to serve for three years.

Read more...
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