National Fisherman

Mixed Catch 

lincIn Mixed Catch, NF Senior Editor Linc Bedrosian spotlights a wide range of commercial fishing-related news items from coast to coast.

So the latest solution being floated to solve the woes of the New England groundfish fishery appears to be an approximately $100 million vessel/permit buyout program. Haven’t we seen this movie before?

Yes, we have, and one need look no further than the NF archives for confirmation. In 1995, lagging groundfish populations spawned a $2 million pilot program to buy out 13 New England groundfish boats with hopes of reducing fleet capacity by 2.6 percent.

Vessels bought through the program were to be scrapped to ensure that fleet capacity would truly be reduced. The only problem was that boat owners who scrapped their vessels turned around and bought new ones.

By 1997, the pilot program had been followed by a more ambitious $23 million buyout program that initially aimed to remove 100 boats, although that total was later revised to 75 to 80 boats. Between the two programs, it was estimated that fishing capacity would be reduced by up to 23.6 percent.

And yet some 15 years later, even with the recognition that climate change and ecosystem shifts are taking more of a toll on groundfish than fishermen are, officials are still slashing away at fishing capacity. A vessel/permit buyout plan may further reduce fishing capacity, but it’ll also eliminate jobs, at sea and in New England communities where fishing remains a vital economic force.

This election year, plenty will be said about the need to stimulate our domestic economy and create jobs. If only such talk would translate into plans to, for example, spend $100 million to improve stock assessments through collaborative efforts that would partner fishermen with scientists.

What New England’s small-boat fishermen and fishing communities need is help to make it through these tough times rather than programs that seem destined to eliminate them.

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 10/21/14

In this episode:

North Pacific Council adjusts observer program
Fishermen: bluefin fishing best in 10 years
Catch limit raised for Bristol Bay red king crab
Canadian fishermen fight over lobster size rules
River conference addresses Dead Zone cleanup

National Fisherman Live: 10/7/14

In this episode, National Fisherman Publisher Jerry Fraser talks about the 1929 dragger Vandal.

 

Inside the Industry

NOAA and its fellow Natural Resource Damage Assessment trustees in the Deepwater Horizon oil spill have announced the signing of a formal Record of Decision to implement a gulf restoration plan. The 44 projects, totaling an estimated $627 million, will restore barrier islands, shorelines, dunes, underwater grasses and oyster beds.

Read more...

The Golden Gate Salmon Association will host its 4th Annual Marin County Dinner at Marin Catholic High School, 675 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., Kentfield on Friday, Oct 10, with doors opening at 5:30 p.m.

Read more...

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