National Fisherman

Mixed Catch 

jerryJerry Fraser is NF's publisher and former editor.

 

 

Folks on Virginia's Tangier Island largely make their living on the water, most as blue crab fishermen, others as tugboat captains and second mates, or as tankermen.

The island has sustained its fewer than 1,000 residents for more than 400 years. But today the tight-knit island community and its cherished way of life face a very real threat. Tangier Island is fast eroding as storms and rising sea levels are taking their toll.

A Russia Today documentary entitled "Tangier — The Vanishing Island" examines the problem. Given how severe the erosion is, how vulnerable the island is to hurricanes and the costs of monitoring residents who choose to remain and protect their houses, Coast Guard and Virginia officials want to move the island's inhabitants to the mainland.

But Tangier Islanders are fighting for their home. It's hoped that a seawall can be erected that will protect the island from further erosion and enable residents to stay.

Yes, there are costs involved in protecting the island and its residents. Maybe it's difficult for officials to justify the expense and amount of resources required to serve such a small community of people.

But I think Tangier Island's true value needs to be weighed, too. So many of our communities have become homogenized and filled with fast-food and retail chains that make it difficult to tell one town from another. We need to recognize that not everyone wants to live in them. Communities like Tangier Island deserve to be preserved.

"It would be a real shame for this island to disappear," photographer Irene Hinke-Sacilotto says in the documentary below. "There's a way of life here that's unique in this country, the crabbers, the oystermen, and so forth. It's a very hard life and yet we get to enjoy the fruits of their labor."

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 3/10/15

In this episode, Online Editor Leslie Taylor talks with Mike McLouglin, vice president of Dunlop Industrial and Protective Footwear.

National Fisherman Live: 2/24/15

In this episode:

March date set for disaster aid dispersal
Oregon LNG project could disrupt fishing
NOAA tweaks gear marking requirement
N.C. launches first commercial/recreational dock
Spiny lobster traps limits not well received

Inside the Industry

The Gulf of Maine Research Institute is partnering with restaurants throughout the region for an Out of the Blue promotion of cape shark, also known as dogfish. Starting Friday, July 3 and running until Sunday, July 12, cape shark will be available at each participating restaurant during the 10-day event. Cape shark is abundant and well deserving of a wider market.



Read more...

As a joint Gulf of Mexico states seafood marketing effort sails into the sunset, the program’s Marketing Director has left for a job in the private seafood sector. Joanne McNeely Zaritsky, the former Marketing Director of the Gulf State Marketing Coalition, has joined St. Petersburg, FL based domestic seafood processor Captain’s Fine Foods as its new business development director to promote its USA shrimp product line.

Read more...

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