National Fisherman

Dec. 31 isn't even upon us and foreign fishing nations are already making a New Year's resolution for 2010: try really, really hard to cut their catches of beleaguered Atlantic bluefin tuna.

Of course, we know how well New Year's resolutions go, don't we? They usually have to do with willpower. And the spirit is usually willing, but the flesh is weak.

Not that our foreign fishing brethren have shown any great desire in the past to curb their bluefin appetite. Yes, the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas lowered the 2009 catch limit from 28,500 metric tons to 22,000 metric tons. But scientists had sought to cut the catch by another 7,000 metric tons.

At this year's ICCAT meeting, which concluded Nov. 15, the organization cut the harvest limit to 13,500 metric tons for 2010. NOAA administrator Jane Lubchenco says the cutback is "a marked improvement over the current rules, but it is insufficient to guarantee the long-term viability of either the fish or the fishery."

The U.S. ICCAT delegation sought a package of measures for eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean bluefin tuna that would end overfishing and offer a high probability of successfully rebuilding bluefin stocks by 2023. According to NOAA, scientific data suggests a total quota of 8,000 metric tons or lower would have been ideal.

But NOAA says that under U.S. leadership in the Compliance Committee, ICCAT made unprecedented progress and held countries accountable for compliance infractions. And the meeting yielded a commitment to implementing a science-based catch level for 2011 to 2013 with a 60 percent chance of meeting the rebuilding target by 2023.

Maybe 2010 will finally be the year our fishing brethren across the sea will commit to curtailing their bluefin harvests. Their past fishing practices don't suggest that will happen, but I'll make a New Year's resolution to try really, really hard to keep an open mind. But you know how New Year's resolutions go.

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 3/10/15

In this episode, Online Editor Leslie Taylor talks with Mike McLouglin, vice president of Dunlop Industrial and Protective Footwear.

National Fisherman Live: 2/24/15

In this episode:

March date set for disaster aid dispersal
Oregon LNG project could disrupt fishing
NOAA tweaks gear marking requirement
N.C. launches first commercial/recreational dock
Spiny lobster traps limits not well received

Inside the Industry

Alaska Gov. Bill Walker is required by state statute to appoint someone to the Board of Fisheries by today, Tuesday, May 19. However, his efforts to fill the seat have gone unfulfilled since he took office in January. The seven-member board serves as an in-state fishery management council for fisheries in state waters.

The resignation of Walker’s director of Boards and Commissions, Karen Gillis, fanned the flames of controversy late last week.

Read more...

Keith Decker, president and COO of High Liner Foods, will take over for the outgoing CEO, Harry Demone, who will assume the role as chairman of the board of directors. The Lunenburg, Nova Scotia-based seafood supplier boasts sales in excess of $310 million (American) for the first quarter of the year.

Read more...
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