National Fisherman

Mixed Catch 

lincIn Mixed Catch, NF Senior Editor Linc Bedrosian spotlights a wide range of commercial fishing-related news items from coast to coast.

When people talk about making short-term sacrifices to achieve long-term benefits, how short a period are they talking about?

I read a story online today, courtesy of WWAY-TV in Wilmington, N.C., about new federal regulations http://www.wwaytv3.com/some_believe_new_fishing_regulations_are_hook/07/2009 that will be imposed upon South Atlantic snapper and grouper harvesters beginning July 29. They limit the amount of snapper and grouper they can catch, and mandate closures lasting several months.

Federal regulators say the measures are needed to reduce overfishing and protect these species. Fishermen disagree; what they see on the water doesn't jive with what the stock assessments tell the regulators.

But what struck me most as I read the story was a quote attributed to NOAA stating, "We're willing to accept short-term losses that could have long-term economic gains by having high stocks, high yields and healthy ecosystems."

What short-term losses is NOAA suffering? Is it trying to figure out how it's going to make its boat and mortgage payments?

I'm taking the quote with a grain of salt, because the story doesn't attribute the quote to a person, just NOAA. So color me surprised that anyone in the agency would make that cavalier a statement.

Then again, this business about making short-term sacrifices for long-term gains is routinely trotted out when harvesting restrictions designed to rebuild fish stocks are implemented — usually by folks who don't have to actually make the sacrifices.

New England groundfish harvesters heard it at least 15 years ago (and probably longer) as regulators began trying to rebuild the region's flatfish stocks.

And here we are all these years later. Vessels and permits have been bought out. Days at sea have been slashed to a bare minimum and various other effort controls have been implemented. The fleet's size has dwindled considerably, and further consolidation is likely with catch share management's arrival in 2010.

But those are all short-term sacrifices, right? For the folks who have to fish in the here and now, the economic gains they've been promised are long overdue.

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 11/06/14

In this episode:

NOAA report touts 2013 landings, value increases
Panama fines GM salmon company Aquabounty
Gulf council passes Reef Fish Amendment 40
Maine elver quota cut by 2,000 pounds
Offshore mussel farm would be East Coast’s first

 

Inside the Industry

EAST SAND ISLAND, Oregon—Alexa Piggott is crawling through a dark, dusty, narrow tunnel on this 62-acre island at the mouth of the Columbia River. On the ground above her head sit thousands of seabirds. Piggott, a crew leader with Bird Research Northwest, is headed for an observation blind from which she'll be able to count them.
 
Read more...

NOAA and its fellow Natural Resource Damage Assessment trustees in the Deepwater Horizon oil spill have announced the signing of a formal Record of Decision to implement a gulf restoration plan. The 44 projects, totaling an estimated $627 million, will restore barrier islands, shorelines, dunes, underwater grasses and oyster beds.

Read more...

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