National Fisherman

Mixed Catch 

jerryJerry Fraser is NF's publisher and former editor.

 

 

Top 5 Mixed Catch Stories

When people talk about making short-term sacrifices to achieve long-term benefits, how short a period are they talking about?

I read a story online today, courtesy of WWAY-TV in Wilmington, N.C., about new federal regulations http://www.wwaytv3.com/some_believe_new_fishing_regulations_are_hook/07/2009 that will be imposed upon South Atlantic snapper and grouper harvesters beginning July 29. They limit the amount of snapper and grouper they can catch, and mandate closures lasting several months.

Federal regulators say the measures are needed to reduce overfishing and protect these species. Fishermen disagree; what they see on the water doesn't jive with what the stock assessments tell the regulators.

But what struck me most as I read the story was a quote attributed to NOAA stating, "We're willing to accept short-term losses that could have long-term economic gains by having high stocks, high yields and healthy ecosystems."

What short-term losses is NOAA suffering? Is it trying to figure out how it's going to make its boat and mortgage payments?

I'm taking the quote with a grain of salt, because the story doesn't attribute the quote to a person, just NOAA. So color me surprised that anyone in the agency would make that cavalier a statement.

Then again, this business about making short-term sacrifices for long-term gains is routinely trotted out when harvesting restrictions designed to rebuild fish stocks are implemented — usually by folks who don't have to actually make the sacrifices.

New England groundfish harvesters heard it at least 15 years ago (and probably longer) as regulators began trying to rebuild the region's flatfish stocks.

And here we are all these years later. Vessels and permits have been bought out. Days at sea have been slashed to a bare minimum and various other effort controls have been implemented. The fleet's size has dwindled considerably, and further consolidation is likely with catch share management's arrival in 2010.

But those are all short-term sacrifices, right? For the folks who have to fish in the here and now, the economic gains they've been promised are long overdue.

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 3/10/15

In this episode, Online Editor Leslie Taylor talks with Mike McLouglin, vice president of Dunlop Industrial and Protective Footwear.

National Fisherman Live: 2/24/15

In this episode:

March date set for disaster aid dispersal
Oregon LNG project could disrupt fishing
NOAA tweaks gear marking requirement
N.C. launches first commercial/recreational dock
Spiny lobster traps limits not well received

Inside the Industry

SeaShare, a non-profit organization that facilitates donations of seafood to feed the hungry, announced on Wednesday, July 29 that it had partnered up with Alaska seafood companies, freight companies and the Coast Guard, to coordinate the donation and delivery of 21,000 pounds of halibut to remote villages in western Alaska. 

On Wednesday, the Coast Guard loaded 21,000 pounds of donated halibut on its C130 airplane in Kodiak and made the 634-mile flight to Nome.

Read more...

The New England Fishery Management Council  is soliciting applications for seats on the Northeast Trawl Survey Advisory Panel and the deadline to apply is July 31 at 5:00 p.m.

The panel will consist of 16 members including members of the councils and the Atlantic States Fishery Commission, industry experts, non-federal scientists and Northeast Fisheries Science Center scientists. Panel members are expected to serve for three years.

Read more...
Try a FREE issue of National Fisherman

Fill out this order form, If you like the magazine, get the rest of the year for just $14.95 (12 issues in all). If not, simply write cancel on the bill, return it, and owe nothing.

First Name
Last Name
Address
Country
U.S. Canada Other

City
State/Province
Postal/ Zip Code
Email
© 2015 Diversified Business Communications
Diversified Business Communications