National Fisherman


Mixed Catch 

jerryJerry Fraser is NF's publisher and former editor.

 

 

Top 5 Mixed Catch Stories

So is anybody jazzed that Exxon Mobil has been ordered to pay about $500 million in interest on the 507.5 million in punitive damages payments to plaintiffs in the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill in Prince William Sound?

Yeah, I didn't think so.

It's understandable. After all, Exxon can still appeal the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco's ruling. Given the years of protracted legal wrangling Exxon engaged in to whittle the punitive damages sum from $5 billion to $500 million, would it be surprising if the oil giant does so again?

If the appeals court's decision stands, average payments to Alaska natives, fishermen, related businesses and others harmed by the spill would double from $15,000 to $30,000. Considering the toll upon fishermen — years of lost income, families torn apart while waiting for years for the case to resolve — you can understand it if folks aren't jumping up and down for joy.

And if Exxon does appeal the ruling to the Supreme Court, who knows how long it'll take to render a decision? Hence, readers commenting on the Anchorage (Alaska) Daily News http://www.adn.com/2009/06/15/831867/court-rules-exxon-owes-a-billion.html article announcing the court's decision were underwhelmed by the ruling.

Asked one reader, "Do we REALLY believe that these folks will ever see any more money from Exxon?"

After years of disappointment, the plaintiffs will believe it when they see it.

Inside the Industry

The following was released by the Maine Department of Marine Resources on Jan. 22:

The Maine Department of Marine Resources announced an emergency regulation that will support the continued rebuilding effort in Maine’s scallop fishery. The rule, effective January 23, 2016, will close the Muscle Ridge Area near South Thomaston and the Western Penobscot Bay Area.

Read more...

Louisiana’s Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, which governs commercial and recreational fishing in the state, got a new boss in January. Charlie Melancon, a former member of the U.S. House of Representatives and state legislator, was appointed to the job by the state’s new governor, John Bel Edwards.

Although much of his non-political work in the past has centered on the state’s sugar cane industry, Melancon said he is confident that other experience, including working closely with fishermen when in Congress, has prepared him well for this new challenge.

Read more...
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