National Fisherman

Mixed Catch 

jerryJerry Fraser is NF's publisher and former editor.



Creating a 61-foot lobster roll is no small feat. But tip your hat to the folks who whipped up this mammoth treat — and for a good cause to boot.

The 61-footer Mainers made last Sunday is likely to enter the Guinness Book of World Records as the world's largest. And I'm guessing bringing such a monumental creation to life was easier said than done.

Think about it; what grocery store's bread aisle stocks a 61-foot roll?

No, the roll had to be made special. So did its bread pan (which was delivered on a flat bed truck) and the oven it was baked in.

Then there's the matter of filling the roll. An army of volunteers gloved up, and tackled the job of filling the roll with about $1,200 worth of lobster meat. Add lots of Miracle Whip, sprinkle with a blend of special seasonings and voila, you have a lobster roll so big, it must be transported by a passel of volunteers, including Maine Roller Derby skaters.

So how did the lobster roll measure up? When appointed official certifiers Portland mayor Jill Duson and Dane Somers, executive director of the Maine Lobster Promotion Council busted out the measuring tape, they found the roll was 61 feet 9 ½ inches long.

That should best the current official Guinness record established in 1997. It's hoped the Portland roll will meet the Guinness folks' exacting standards.

The city's West End Neighborhood Association and Linda Bean's Perfect Maine coordinated the fund-raising event, which was part of Portland's annual Old Port Festival. Sales of 4-inch long slices of the beast were sold, with proceeds going to fund the association's Swimming Scholarship fund. They'll provide swimming lessons for some 250 needy children in Portland's West End. And that leaves a good taste in everyone's mouth.

Inside the Industry

NMFS has awarded 16 grants totaling more than $2.5 million as part of its Bycatch Reduction Engineering Program.

The program supports the development of technological solutions and changes in fishing practices designed to minimize bycatch and aims to to find creative approaches and strategies for reducing bycatch, seabird interactions, and post-release mortality in federally managed fisheries.


Abe Williams, who was elected to the Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association board last spring, has been selected as the new president as of September.

Williams fishes the F/V Crimson Fury, and is president of Nuna Resources, a nonprofit that supports sustainable resource development in rural Alaska, including fighting for an international solution to issues raised by the proposed Pebble Mine project.

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