National Fisherman

The tuna auction at Tokyo's historic Tsukiji seafood market has become a top tourist attraction for foreigners, according to an Associated Press story that appeared in the Asbury Park (N.J.) Press. In fact, it's become so popular, auction officials actually had to suspend tours of the pre-dawn tuna auctions for a few weeks. It seems the tourists were getting a little unruly — apparently to the point where people were licking the tuna.

As syndicated humor columnist Dave Barry would say, I am not making this up.

Mind you, I enjoy tuna as much as the next guy (unless it is in a noodle casserole). Grilled tuna steaks? Yum. If I'm at a sushi bar, I'm all over the tuna sushi roll. And I consider a nice tuna sandwich and a bottle of orange soda one of life's great simple pleasures.

Still, I have not been so moved by tuna that I have felt compelled to lick it. Not even when I'm on vacation.

Alas, the incident is only mentioned in passing, so I cannot gauge the depth of this particular problem. But it raises many questions, such as:

• Was the licking an isolated incident or were there repeated offenses? If you are caught licking a tuna, is jail time involved? Can tourists be deported because of it?

• Are there support groups for recovering tuna lickers?

• The auction displays hundreds of frozen tuna; has anyone attempting to lick one found to their dismay that their tongue has frozen to the unfortunate tuna?

The good news is that the auction is again open to tourists. All auction officials ask is that the tourists keep a civil tongue in their heads.

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 3/10/15

In this episode, Online Editor Leslie Taylor talks with Mike McLouglin, vice president of Dunlop Industrial and Protective Footwear.

National Fisherman Live: 2/24/15

In this episode:

March date set for disaster aid dispersal
Oregon LNG project could disrupt fishing
NOAA tweaks gear marking requirement
N.C. launches first commercial/recreational dock
Spiny lobster traps limits not well received

Inside the Industry

Alaska Gov. Bill Walker is required by state statute to appoint someone to the Board of Fisheries by today, Tuesday, May 19. However, his efforts to fill the seat have gone unfulfilled since he took office in January. The seven-member board serves as an in-state fishery management council for fisheries in state waters.

The resignation of Walker’s director of Boards and Commissions, Karen Gillis, fanned the flames of controversy late last week.

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Keith Decker, president and COO of High Liner Foods, will take over for the outgoing CEO, Harry Demone, who will assume the role as chairman of the board of directors. The Lunenburg, Nova Scotia-based seafood supplier boasts sales in excess of $310 million (American) for the first quarter of the year.

Read more...
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