National Fisherman


Mixed Catch 

jerryJerry Fraser is NF's publisher and former editor.

 

 

The World Wide Fund for Nature is seeing red over bluefin.

According to an Agence France-Presse article http://afp.google.com/article/ALeqM5iOx3Z__xvoOig-_pRzKBMLF7sLCw, WWF, sounding a tad like Regis Philbin ranting on his morning talk show, is asserting that Italy is "totally out of control" when it comes to fishing for bluefin tuna.

Usually, one raises an eyebrow when an environmental group starts barking that commercial fishing harvest practices are emptying the world's oceans of fish. But WWF tends to put its money where its mouth is. For example, they're the folks behind the International Smart Gear Competition, which awards cash prizes for the best ideas promoting sustainable fishing practices.

WWF's Italian chapter released a statement denouncing "widespread and repeated lawlessness over the course of years" on the part of Italian fishermen targeting the tasty and profitable fish that's so highly sought in Japan. Reportedly, the Italian fleet blew past its 2008 harvest quota by "at least 700 tons," WWF says.

This, of course, isn't news to American fishermen. U.S. fishermen for some time now have shouldered the brunt of efforts to fish sustainably for bluefin and swordfish. Their reward? They routinely have to fight tooth and nail just to hang onto their harvest quotas.

Meanwhile, member nations like Italy constantly thumb their noses at the harvest quotas the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas sets.

With the next ICCAT meetings looming in November, the U.S. delegation is girding its loins to do battle once more. Which makes one wonder, if ICCAT remains powerless to stop member nations from fishing irresponsibly, at what point do we say there's no point to being an ICCAT member?

Inside the Industry

The American Fisheries Society is honoring recently retired Florida Institute of Oceanography director Bill Hogarth with the Carl R. Sullivan Fishery Conservation Award — one of the nation's premier awards in fisheries science - in recognition of his long career and leadership in preserving some of the world's most threatened species, advocating for environmental protections and leading Florida's scientific response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

Read more...

The Marine Stewardship Council has appointed Eric Critchlow as the new U.S. Program Director. Critchlow will be based in the MSC US headquarters in Seattle. He is a former vice president of Lusamerica Foods and has over 35 years in the seafood industry.

Read more...
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