National Fisherman

On Wednesday came the news that a Pacific Fishery Management memo circulated last week revealed that the number of returning fish in fall 2007 totaled just 90,000, thus jeopardizing the spring commercial and recreational fisheries; the council's minimum conservation target is 122,000 fish.

Initially, it seems shocking a freefall in the number of adult spawners making their way back to the Sacramento could happen so quickly. According to a report in the Sacramento Bee this week, some 200,000 chinook annually have returned to the river and its tributaries for approximately 15 years.
But West Coast fishermen have known that things haven't been looking good with the Sacramento run. In 2002, 800,000 fish were counted. By 2006, the total had dropped to some 250,000 spawners.

Now, already reeling from the woes that have bedeviled the Klamath River salmon stocks the past couple of years, the fleet now faces another fishery disaster.

What's causing the decline? Is it poor ocean conditions that are depriving salmon and other marine species of the food they need to survive? Federal policies that dam up rivers and divert water away from migrating salmon? Ocean interception of returning spawners by foreign fleets? Or is it D) All of the above? Somehow, my money's on "D."

Fortunately, for the immediate future of the West Coast salmon fleet, there's already talk of disaster relief legislation being drawn up. Let's hope the final dollar amount will be enough to help the West Coast fleet remain afloat until the salmon stocks rebuild. Boat and mortgage payments and other bills don't stop coming due just because fishing is curtailed.

In the meantime, maybe it's finally time for our elected leaders to focus on doing something besides "rationalizing" fisheries, and get serious about doing the work necessary to rebuild these troubled fish stocks.

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 3/10/15

In this episode, Online Editor Leslie Taylor talks with Mike McLouglin, vice president of Dunlop Industrial and Protective Footwear.

National Fisherman Live: 2/24/15

In this episode:

March date set for disaster aid dispersal
Oregon LNG project could disrupt fishing
NOAA tweaks gear marking requirement
N.C. launches first commercial/recreational dock
Spiny lobster traps limits not well received

Inside the Industry

Alaska Gov. Bill Walker is required by state statute to appoint someone to the Board of Fisheries by today, Tuesday, May 19. However, his efforts to fill the seat have gone unfulfilled since he took office in January. The seven-member board serves as an in-state fishery management council for fisheries in state waters.

The resignation of Walker’s director of Boards and Commissions, Karen Gillis, fanned the flames of controversy late last week.

Read more...

Keith Decker, president and COO of High Liner Foods, will take over for the outgoing CEO, Harry Demone, who will assume the role as chairman of the board of directors. The Lunenburg, Nova Scotia-based seafood supplier boasts sales in excess of $310 million (American) for the first quarter of the year.

Read more...
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