National Fisherman

Mixed Catch 

lincIn Mixed Catch, NF Senior Editor Linc Bedrosian spotlights a wide range of commercial fishing-related news items from coast to coast.

Alaska wild-caught salmon is definitely in fashion these days — one need only get a load of what Copper River salmon commands for price to understand that. But now the word is the state's prized fish has the opportunity to become fashion.

According to Alaska Dispatch, salmon skin is being fashioned into leather. And it's being used to make all sorts of products — shoes, wallets, handbags, jackets, pants and dresses.

"There is a large demand for it," Sabah Coles, who works in Germany-based manufacturer Nanai's newly opened Los Angeles office, told the Dispatch. "It's used for iPhone covers, motorcycle seats, and has been used for golf gloves, shoes, wall panels, lamps and book binding — anything that you can do with regular leather."

Check out the pics of some of these creations. http://www.alaskadispatch.com/article/could-demand-salmon-leather-spawn-new-cottage-industry-alaska (Note to self: Do not let girlfriend see the shoes. Her Shoe Shrine is already obscenely large.)

Not only are salmon leather products in demand, they are being touted as being eco-friendly. Salmon leather, the story says, is considered "a sustainable material derived from the natural bio-waste of salmon processing."

Well, here's to you Alaska salmon. You're delicious, nutritious and will soon be gracing the runways of Paris, Milan and New York.

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 11/06/14

In this episode:

NOAA report touts 2013 landings, value increases
Panama fines GM salmon company Aquabounty
Gulf council passes Reef Fish Amendment 40
Maine elver quota cut by 2,000 pounds
Offshore mussel farm would be East Coast’s first

 

Inside the Industry

Fishermen in Western Australia captured astonishing footage this week as a five-meter-long great white shark tried to steal their catch, ramming into the side of their boat.
 
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EAST SAND ISLAND, Oregon—Alexa Piggott is crawling through a dark, dusty, narrow tunnel on this 62-acre island at the mouth of the Columbia River. On the ground above her head sit thousands of seabirds. Piggott, a crew leader with Bird Research Northwest, is headed for an observation blind from which she'll be able to count them.
 
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