National Fisherman

Mixed Catch 

jerryJerry Fraser is NF's publisher and former editor.

 

 

Last month, I wrote about “The Watermen,” http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1715223/ a horror film being shot in Virginia in which a clan of commercial fishermen captures a crew of sport fishermen; trapped on an island, the anglers must fight for their lives.
Well, with Halloween little more than a week away, it seems only fitting to write about another horror movie being filmed that has a commercial fishing background. But it’s a horror movie of a different sort — one that’s all too real to New England fishermen.



In New Bedford, Mass., Dartmouth native Jay Burke is shooting the appropriately named low-budget film “Whaling City”. It’s described on the movie's website http://whalingcityfilm.com/ as “a dramatic narrative feature film set in New Bedford, Mass., in the rapidly changing world of the modern fishing industry.”



It’s a project that’s been a decade in the making. The screenplay was workshopped at Columbia University's graduate film program from 1999 to 2002. It won the 2005 Alfred P. Sloan Screenwriting Award and the 2007 Sloan Feature Film Production Grant.



According to the website, “Whaling City” is “the story of a third-generation independent commercial fisherman, struggling to keep a grasp on his way of life — and a long-held family boat — as costs rise and the heavily regulated fishing industry is pushed towards a corporate model of efficiency. While developing an unlikely relationship with a marine biologist, he is tempted to do whatever it takes to keep his boat.”



Wait — there’s a romance between a fisherman and a government fisheries scientist? I don’t think marine scientists are feeling a lot of love from commercial fishermen these days, but stranger things have happened.



But more importantly, the approximately 100-minute-long film, which is in production this fall, is attempting to tell the story of what’s happening to commercial fishing in New England, and why the average American should care. You can have your ghosts, goblins, vampires, witches and werewolves. The scariest thing I can think of is an honorable and historic 400-year-old industry vanishing before our very eyes.

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 3/10/15

In this episode, Online Editor Leslie Taylor talks with Mike McLouglin, vice president of Dunlop Industrial and Protective Footwear.

National Fisherman Live: 2/24/15

In this episode:

March date set for disaster aid dispersal
Oregon LNG project could disrupt fishing
NOAA tweaks gear marking requirement
N.C. launches first commercial/recreational dock
Spiny lobster traps limits not well received

Inside the Industry

The New England Fishery Management Council  is soliciting applications for seats on the Northeast Trawl Survey Advisory Panel and the deadline to apply is July 31 at 5:00 p.m.

The panel will consist of 16 members including members of the councils and the Atlantic States Fishery Commission, industry experts, non-federal scientists and Northeast Fisheries Science Center scientists. Panel members are expected to serve for three years.

Read more...

Commercial salmon fishermen will have 12 hours to fish Oregon's lower Columbia River, starting at 7 p.m. tonight.

Biologists upgraded their forecast for the summer king run to 120,000, the largest since at least 1960.

Read more...
Try a FREE issue of National Fisherman

Fill out this order form, If you like the magazine, get the rest of the year for just $14.95 (12 issues in all). If not, simply write cancel on the bill, return it, and owe nothing.

First Name
Last Name
Address
Country
U.S. Canada Other

City
State/Province
Postal/ Zip Code
Email
© 2015 Diversified Business Communications
Diversified Business Communications