National Fisherman

Mixed Catch 

jerryJerry Fraser is NF's publisher and former editor.



We're about ready to celebrate a milestone here at National Fisherman. When the November issue arrives in your mailbox, we'll be blowing out the candles on the proverbial birthday cake (and keeping a fire extinguisher handy) to celebrate our 50th anniversary.

You'll get the detailed low down on the magazine's history in our November issue, featuring contributions from editors and writers past and present. They'll weigh in on changes in the magazine and the industry over five decades.

You'll also find some interesting fishing data from 1960. Here's another tidbit.

According to the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries publication "Fishery Statistics of the United States 1960," U.S. commercial fishing landings that year totaled 4.9 billion pounds worth $353.6 million. The commercial catch was taken by 130,431 fishermen. In 1970, 140,538 fishermen landed 4.9 billion pounds.

The number of fishermen taking the commercial harvest reached 182,068 in 1977 when 5.3 billion pounds were landed; the statistic regarding number of fishermen isn't included in later year versions of U.S. fishery statistics. But in the era of consolidation that holds sway under current fishery management philosophy it seems likely that fishermen's numbers have thinned some since those days.

And should the march towards implementing catch share management in U.S. fisheries continue, they may well thin some more.

Inside the Industry

NMFS recently released a draft action plan for fish discard and release mortality science, creating a list of actions that they hope can better inform fisheries.

We know that fishermen have to deal with bycatch by discarding or releasing unwanted catch overboard, but there is a data gap regarding how those fish survive.


A new study has identified a set of features common to all ocean ecosystems that provide a visual diagnosis of the health of the underwater environment coastal communities rely on.

Together, the features detail cumulative effects of threats -- such as overfishing, pollution, and invasive species,  allowing responders to act faster to increase ocean resiliency and sustainability.

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Diversified Business Communications