National Fisherman

Fishermen have longed to get their story out to the American public for years. "Deadliest Catch," the hit Discovery Channel reality television series, is helping them do it.

The show has done an incredible job of giving the general public a real taste of what it's like to be an Alaska crab fisherman. Viewers finally get to see fishermen in their element — and the elements alone are enough to make fans shake their heads and tip their collective cap to the crabbers for doing so.

Viewers see what fishermen's jobs are like, and how hard the work is. But more importantly, they get to know the captains and crew members. Suddenly, viewers understand these guys aren't just fishermen, they're real people.

That the message is getting through to the American public became clearer to me this week. The latest episode of "Deadliest Catch" caught the attention of a nationally broadcast sports talk radio program, The Dan Patrick Show.

Patrick and the show's four-member crew, known as "The Danettes" normally talk about the latest sports stories of the day. But they found time this week to discuss the latest "Deadliest Catch" episode. The season's final six episodes deal focus on the passing of Cornelia Marie captain Phil Harris, who this season suffered a stroke that eventually claimed him.

Patrick's executive producer, Paul Pabst, who on the show's Website lists "Deadliest Catch" among his favorite TV shows, called the episode "powerful television." And his fellow Danettes likewise expressed their admiration for the dangerous, demanding work the crabbers do.

They only touched on the episode for a minute or two. But even a brief mention on a radio show that's heard nationwide (it's also shown on DIRECTV) raises the profile of commercial fishermen tremendously. So just think of the positive effect a full 60-minute episode of "Deadliest Catch" is having every week.

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 3/10/15

In this episode, Online Editor Leslie Taylor talks with Mike McLouglin, vice president of Dunlop Industrial and Protective Footwear.

National Fisherman Live: 2/24/15

In this episode:

March date set for disaster aid dispersal
Oregon LNG project could disrupt fishing
NOAA tweaks gear marking requirement
N.C. launches first commercial/recreational dock
Spiny lobster traps limits not well received

Inside the Industry

Alaska Gov. Bill Walker is required by state statute to appoint someone to the Board of Fisheries by today, Tuesday, May 19. However, his efforts to fill the seat have gone unfulfilled since he took office in January. The seven-member board serves as an in-state fishery management council for fisheries in state waters.

The resignation of Walker’s director of Boards and Commissions, Karen Gillis, fanned the flames of controversy late last week.

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Keith Decker, president and COO of High Liner Foods, will take over for the outgoing CEO, Harry Demone, who will assume the role as chairman of the board of directors. The Lunenburg, Nova Scotia-based seafood supplier boasts sales in excess of $310 million (American) for the first quarter of the year.

Read more...
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