National Fisherman


Mixed Catch 

jerryJerry Fraser is NF's publisher and former editor.

 

 

Fishermen have longed to get their story out to the American public for years. "Deadliest Catch," the hit Discovery Channel reality television series, is helping them do it.

The show has done an incredible job of giving the general public a real taste of what it's like to be an Alaska crab fisherman. Viewers finally get to see fishermen in their element — and the elements alone are enough to make fans shake their heads and tip their collective cap to the crabbers for doing so.

Viewers see what fishermen's jobs are like, and how hard the work is. But more importantly, they get to know the captains and crew members. Suddenly, viewers understand these guys aren't just fishermen, they're real people.

That the message is getting through to the American public became clearer to me this week. The latest episode of "Deadliest Catch" caught the attention of a nationally broadcast sports talk radio program, The Dan Patrick Show.

Patrick and the show's four-member crew, known as "The Danettes" normally talk about the latest sports stories of the day. But they found time this week to discuss the latest "Deadliest Catch" episode. The season's final six episodes deal focus on the passing of Cornelia Marie captain Phil Harris, who this season suffered a stroke that eventually claimed him.

Patrick's executive producer, Paul Pabst, who on the show's Website lists "Deadliest Catch" among his favorite TV shows, called the episode "powerful television." And his fellow Danettes likewise expressed their admiration for the dangerous, demanding work the crabbers do.

They only touched on the episode for a minute or two. But even a brief mention on a radio show that's heard nationwide (it's also shown on DIRECTV) raises the profile of commercial fishermen tremendously. So just think of the positive effect a full 60-minute episode of "Deadliest Catch" is having every week.

Inside the Industry

The American Fisheries Society is honoring recently retired Florida Institute of Oceanography director Bill Hogarth with the Carl R. Sullivan Fishery Conservation Award — one of the nation's premier awards in fisheries science - in recognition of his long career and leadership in preserving some of the world's most threatened species, advocating for environmental protections and leading Florida's scientific response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

Read more...

The Marine Stewardship Council has appointed Eric Critchlow as the new U.S. Program Director. Critchlow will be based in the MSC US headquarters in Seattle. He is a former vice president of Lusamerica Foods and has over 35 years in the seafood industry.

Read more...
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