National Fisherman

Bumble Bee Foods' decision to close the nation's last herring cannery is an excellent example of why U.S. fishermen are heading to Washington, D.C., for the fishermen's rally on Wednesday, Feb. 24.

Bumble Bee, which acquired the former Stinson Seafood cannery in Prospect Harbor, Maine, in 2004, announced its decision to shut the cannery down http://bangordailynews.com/2010/02/17/business/after-century-of-business-former-stinson-seafood-plant-closing/ Wednesday afternoon. Bumble Bee cites federal herring catch limit reductions as the main reason for the closure.

When Bumble Bee acquired the plant in 2004, the harvest limit was 180,000 metric tons. Today, it's half that.

The 2010 harvest limit is controversial. The revised Magnuson-Stevens Act gives science the greatest weight in determining catch levels. Given that and the need to take into account "management uncertainty" about the biomass numbers, fishery managers believed they had no choice but to make significant harvest cuts.

But industry advocates argue that the stock assessment data doesn't warrant such severe reductions. Now the Prospect Harbor plant, which employs 128 people and has been operating for more than a century, will close its doors on April 18.

Bumble Bee says it will provide severance pay and job placement counseling to the cannery workers who are losing their jobs. But the impact of the closing on the town of Prospect Harbor is going to be significant.

The closing is a real hit to that town's economy. How many towns have an extra 128 jobs in their back pocket?

But Magnuson-Stevens doesn't let managers give the socio-economic impact regulations have upon fishermen and fishing communities the same weight as scientific data regarding stock health. That imbalance must be addressed.

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 3/10/15

In this episode, Online Editor Leslie Taylor talks with Mike McLouglin, vice president of Dunlop Industrial and Protective Footwear.

National Fisherman Live: 2/24/15

In this episode:

March date set for disaster aid dispersal
Oregon LNG project could disrupt fishing
NOAA tweaks gear marking requirement
N.C. launches first commercial/recreational dock
Spiny lobster traps limits not well received

Inside the Industry

Alaska Gov. Bill Walker is required by state statute to appoint someone to the Board of Fisheries by today, Tuesday, May 19. However, his efforts to fill the seat have gone unfulfilled since he took office in January. The seven-member board serves as an in-state fishery management council for fisheries in state waters.

The resignation of Walker’s director of Boards and Commissions, Karen Gillis, fanned the flames of controversy late last week.

Read more...

Keith Decker, president and COO of High Liner Foods, will take over for the outgoing CEO, Harry Demone, who will assume the role as chairman of the board of directors. The Lunenburg, Nova Scotia-based seafood supplier boasts sales in excess of $310 million (American) for the first quarter of the year.

Read more...
Try a FREE issue of National Fisherman

Fill out this order form, If you like the magazine, get the rest of the year for just $14.95 (12 issues in all). If not, simply write cancel on the bill, return it, and owe nothing.

First Name
Last Name
Address
Country
U.S. Canada Other

City
State/Province
Postal/ Zip Code
Email