National Fisherman

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melissaNational Fisherman's Melissa Wood shares her stories as a writer and editor covering the U.S. fishing industry.

 

It's so cold even Florida is under a wind-chill warning. That's because of the polar vortex dipping down from the North Pole that's bringing sub-zero temperatures with it. My own polar vortex experience hasn't been too bad: I lost water yesterday when a pipe burst in my building's basement, but it's fixed now and I'm warm and can take showers again.

That's a common story. Cold weather can cause a lot of damage, and not just to buildings. If you're in Florida or other places in the South not used to frigid temperatures, you should probably turn to page 30 when you receive your February issue of National Fisherman. In the article, "Save room for vroom," Brian Robbins writes about how to prevent freeze-ups before your pack up after a long winter's workday.

Before you go home for the night, Robbins recommends shutting off your boat's raw-water intake then adding antifreeze and rolling the engine over a few times to pump it through the system. He cautions to make sure to do the reverse before you head out again the next day.

Even if yoicebreaking USCGLaurenDownsu're not experiencing the polar vortex, I'd recommend checking out Robbins' article. As a former offshore lobsterman and longtime contributor to National Fisherman, he offers common-sense tips for making engine maintenance easier that should come in handy all year.

I realize that these sub-zero temperatures aren't a novelty for our readers in Alaska, but being used to them means that you're also better prepared. Do you have any cold-weather tips you can share with our commercial fishermen readers in the South? And yes, I realize we're all in the south compared to you...

Photo of ice breaking on Maine's Kennebec River by Lauren Downs/USCG

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In 2012, a year after implementing catch shares in the West Coast groundfish fishery, NOAA was calling the program a success. It was hard to argue with the numbers: The fishery made $54 million in 2011 compared to its historical average of $38 million for 2006-2010. In addition, bycatch was down from 15 percent to 1.3 percent.

But some California fishermen are telling a different story about catch shares. Jeremiah O'Brien, director of the Morro Bay Commercial Fishermen’s Organization, called the program the "worst thing that ever happened to the fishing industry." Likewise, Jiri Nozicka of Monterey Bay told the Associated Press he hasn't been able to fish since spring because he can't find a monitor willing to go out on his trawler the San Giovanni (the Juneau Empire has a photo).

NOAAobserverThe lack of observers is hitting the fleet hard. “Financially, I can only say that multiple trips have been cancelled due to a lack of availability of these monitors, millions of pounds of fish have not been caught, processed and sold to markets and this is a loss of millions of dollars,” Michael Lucas, president of North Coast Fisheries, wrote in a letter to federal regulators that was also included in the AP report.

Electronic monitoring might help. Alaska's halibut longliner fleet is also pushing for the use of cameras instead of costly observers. That industry recently drafted an exempted fisheries permit for the use of cameras, which NMFS rejected because of a lack of technical specifications and performance standards. Its fleet also stands to lose its small boats if a more cost-effective solution to fund monitors isn't found soon.

Unfortunately, it may be too late for some in California. Beginning in 2014 fishermen can sell their quota, which was prohibited by a two-year moratorium when the program launched in 2011. Along with the loss of small boats also goes the fishing industries in the small ports they call home. If that happens, I wouldn't call it a success.

NOAA photo

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It was the best of times, it was the worst of times. Dickens' iconic opening lines could also sum up this country's commercial fishing for any given year. A banner year for one fisherman could mean a horrible year for another.

2013 was the best of times for Alaska salmon fishermen. In recollecting the past year, they don't have to search for reasons to be grateful. They had record-breaking catches in 2013. During the Pacific Marine Expo in November I met some coming off this season who were ready to make the most of their good fortune.

Jim Whitcher of Anacortes, Wash., had just bought a new boat for gillnetting on Bristol Bay. He closed a couple days before the Expo. Another fisherman, Ray Forsman, skipper of the Silver Isle, told me it was a normal year, which he said (and other fishermen will probably agree) is a "good thing."

But Alaska's salmon fishermen have known the worst of times too. I also caught up with Vicko Fiamengo of Belllingham, Wash., at the Expo. The longtime salmon fisherman was only 16 years old when he left his home of Komiza, a historic fishing village in Croatia, in 1970.

“I was born on a little island back in Croatia. I fished on the dock in the port when I was five years old, and I’ve been fishing since,” said Fiamengo.

So 20 years ago, when salmon prices dipped down to 35, 25 cents a pound he never left the fishery. He remembers going out when it was just “me and the fish and game [enforcement personnel] and one other guy.”

But it was not enough to get Fiamengo off the water. “I didn’t go to school. That’s in my blood,” he said. “That’s all I do. That’s all I know.”

Perhaps his story of perserverance will inspire those whose fisheries experienced the worst of times in 2013. It may not be the best of times, but sometimes normal is good enough.

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The often overlooked requirement of the Magnuson-Stevens Act is not overlooked by Madeleine Hall-Arber. As MIT Sea Grant’s marine anthropologist, she was one of the first people to closely study the social impact of regulations on fisheries.

In the field for 25 years, she works with New Bedford fisheries managers on how their decisions will affect their communities. In a new video released last week by NOAA she talks about New Bedford's Working Waterfront Festival.

While there is a rich heritage to celebrate in one of America's most historic ports, New Bedford is also the leading port in value, and Hall-Arber says that spreading the word about the importance of the industry today is an important goal of the festival.

"Part of the effort for the festival is to make the young people realize there's still an industry, there's still a value to working in the industry," she says.

As she points out, the value of those jobs goes beyond a paycheck. People who work in fishing should be proud of what they do. Their jobs put food on many people's tables — and not just their own.

Her words are a reminder of all that is lost along with the economic disaster facing the region's groundfish industry. But there are still those trying to keep this struggling part of the industry alive. When the New England council meets this week, the Northeast Seafood Coalition is proposing alternative management strategies that could help create stability in annual catch limits, Executive Director Jackie Odell told the Gloucester Daily Times.

The three-day council meeting started yesterday in Danvers, Mass. Those who are unable to attend can listen in on the proceedings by clicking on this link: https://www4.gotomeeting.com/register/865489879.

Learn more about Hall-Arber's work by watching the video below.

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Jamie&AshleyI went shrimping for the first time almost two years ago. The 65-foot trawler Jamie & Ashley left Portland a little before 4:30 on Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2012, a week after the opening of the northern shrimp season in the Gulf of Maine.

My story of that day begins shortly after we left port, with the chatter of other fishermen also out that morning:

"There's plenty of squawking coming over the radio as we head out of Portland harbor.

"'You can't f-king do it three f-king days a week,' says one unidentified voice."

The overheard complaints stemmed from strict rules for the 2012 season. Trawlers like the Jamie & Ashley could only fish on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, beginning a half hour before sunrise and ending, with gear out of the water, at 3 p.m.

The story represents a couple firsts for me. It was the first time I had started a story with an f-bomb (or the indication of one). It was also the first time I had gone out on a commercial fishing boat and written about it for the magazine.

That day also marked the first time I saw the competitive nature of fishermen firsthand. The restrictions were designed to make a shortage in quota last longer, but they meant that everybody had to be out at the same time. Which meant everybody wanted to be in the best spots.

The ocean becomes a small place when fishing boats are on top of each other. It was the beginning of the season, but the Jamie & Ashley had done well so far, scooping up 5,000 and 7,000 pounds of shrimp its two previous times out (by comparison another boat had only hauled in 700 pounds on Monday). So when skipper Steve Jordan picked a spot to tow he had company "within punching distance," as he put it.

After a tense encounter with another boat that wanted in our groove, the first haul was a good one. But when Jordan decided to move away from the crowd, the catch thinned out too. "What are you going to do? That's fishing," as Jordan put it.

The rules and a quota cut in half made the 2012 season a difficult one. After the first couple weeks, Allyson Jordan, owner of the Jamie & Ashley (no relation to Steve), decided to piggyback groundfish trips on shrimp days so Jordan and the two crew members could at least make a living wage for their time on the water.

This year there will be no shrimp season. The closure, which followed a November assessment showing the collapse of the stock, is the first in 35 years.

With northern shrimp off the table, New England fishermen already struggling with poor groundfish quotas and low lobster prices have lost a fishery that was helping to make up the difference.

Being a fisherman has always been a gamble, but nobody wants to play a game when there's no chance of winning. If we want to preserve fishing in New England, people like Allyson need the flexibility and support to be innovative to come up with a Plan B. Or Plan C, D or E, if necessary.

I've read that there have been discussions of requesting federal aid for fishermen affected by the shrimp collapse. If money is available, shouldn't it go toward developing markets for species that are plentiful and gear innovations to avoid the ones that aren't? Give New England fishermen a chance to show their fighting spirit.

Photo by Melissa Wood

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RoannIt's a good thing the Eastern-rigged dragger Roann was well ballasted. After she was built in 1947, owner Roy Campbell of Vineyard Haven, Mass., would fish 120 miles off Cape Cod, all year. That's pretty far offshore for a 60-footer, but she was kept stable with 22,000 pounds of concrete and scrap metal.

Her stability was put to the test one early morning in 1953. With the captain in his bunk and the mate at the wheel, "a huge wall of water, a rogue wave, reared up in front of the Roann. She rode up one side and then dropped off into the trough. She fell over 90 degrees, pushing the mastheads under water and launching the sleeping cook across the fo'c'sle. But the Roann popped back up with the net wrapped around the spring stay," says Walter Ansel, senior shipwright for Connecticut's Mystic Seaport museum.

She survived that day and survives still, as one of the last remaining Eastern-rigged wooden draggers. These vessels fished off New England's coast in the mid-to-late 20th century before they were replaced by steel stern draggers.

The maritime museum bought Roann in 1997 but didn't begin restoration work until 2005. As Michael Crowley writes in the January issue of National Fisherman, the challenging work wouldn't have been possible without dedicated volunteers who spent thousands of hours retaining her original craftsmanship and repairing the wear from five decades worth of highliner-level fishing. Mike's story begins on page 28.

If you really like wooden boats — and many of our readers do — you can visit her in person too. The Roann is part of the historic vessel collection at the Mystic Seaport museum in Mystic, Conn. Learn more here.

Photo courtesy of Mystic Seaport

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I'm embarrassed. Yesterday I read the article, "12 Fish to Stay Away From" on prevention.com. This article doesn't discriminate about what type of seafood to avoid: many fish from different waters made the list (like Atlantic cod). As one commenter says, "I think they just listed every form of seafood currently sold in our stores and restaurants. So what ARE we supposed to eat?"

As a journalist, I'm embarrassed that this article uses one source (Food & Water Watch) to write about a subject the writer seems to know very little about. It reads as if the environmental group handed the writer a press release and it was copied verbatim. Where's the balance?

The problem goes beyond journalistic integrity. I write about fish and seafood every day, but most people don't have time to memorize what's good and what's bad — and to look into whether the group telling them these things has an agenda. Even if you agree with some of the choices on the list, most people will only take away this lesson: don't eat fish.

And this is the broader message that people are getting about your product, your livelihood. That it's bad.

We know that's not true. We know that all fish caught in U.S. waters is managed sustainably, and the only thing a concerned consumer needs to look for is seafood with the United States listed as the country of origin (those labels are required by law).

So what can we do? Tell your friends and family to buy local or U.S. product. You can also point them to websites like NOAA's FishWatch, a site intended for consumers that explains the U.S. fishing industry and its species. NOAA has also launched the educational initiative Seafood 101 to give consumers and especially kids a positive message about U.S. seafood and its health benefits.

For my part, I'm going to keep writing good stories about the people in America who work as fishermen. It's important to show the reality of the U.S. fishing industry and the people in it to counter the bad press and negative information. It's a battle, but it's worth fighting.

Speaking of press, do people in your community know about what you do? Contact a local reporter, or contact me about the possibility of sharing the story of your fishing life in the pages of National Fisherman. You can reach me at mwood@divcom.com.

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The West Coast and East Coast may be apples and oranges when it comes to collaborative research, but which is the model for how it should be done?

“The West Coast has never not had the industry involved in cooperativeJimmyRuhle research. You’ve always had good participation. You’ve got industry participation every level of the way,” said North Carolina skipper Jimmy Ruhle (right) during a session on cooperative research at the Pacific Marine Expo on Wednesday.

On the East Coast collaboration between scientists and fishermen has been a more recent development after years of the former not taking input from the latter seriously, he pointed out.

But the West Coast has room for improvement too, said John Gauvin, of the Alaska Seafood Cooperative. He looked at the level of NOAA involvement in various programs and found that it was more involved with the short-term ones, if involved at all. That kind of independence from NOAA could make it difficult for industry funded research to be implemented in fishery management decisions.

He believes a regional cooperative research program for Alaska — which doesn’t exist now — would provide an infrastructure for various efforts.

“Why wouldn't we want to have our own cooperative research program through NOAA like they do in New England?” he asked. “I really don't know if we’re the apples or the oranges.”

Research projects in the North Pacific run the gamut in size and scale, but what they all have in common is that NOAA manages the fisheries they study. Including NOAA in the collaborative process could make the information collected more valuable to Alaska's fisheries.

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A quick search for commercial fishing items on Twitter brought the following tweet to the top of my screen: “Did u know? Commercial fishing kills nearly 1,000 OTHER animals per day including SHARKS, DOLPHINS, SEALS, & WHALES.”

It’s no wonder fishermen sometimes feel like they’re under attack. When you go to the ocean you’re just doing your job — feeding people — and yet you’re often called out as murderers by some very vocal groups.

Negatives messages like these ignore continued advances in bycatch reduction made by the scientific and commercial fishing communities. The latest such innovation – ultraviolet lights that warn sea turtles away from fishing nets — comes from John Wang, a fisheries researcher at the University of Hawaii at Manoa.

Since sea turtles can perceive ultraviolet light, while many fish cannot, he decided to experiment with putting UV lights on fishing nets as a turtle deterrent. Working with fishermen from Baja California Sur, Mexico, he demonstrated that the lights were able to reduce turtle bycatch by 40 percent.

As reported by Scientific American, Wang said the fishermen were at first reluctant to work with him, but soon “came to realize that we're not trying to save turtles at the expense of fishing communities.”

The lights, which are resusable, battery-powered and cost about $2 each, are also proof that not every innovative product requires a total boat/gear rehaul. At such a low cost, environmental groups could easily buy some of these lights and distribute them to fishermen whose nets pose a threat to turtles. That might be a little more effective in protecting sea turtles than calling fishermen killers on Twitter.

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When I have a disaster at work, it's because I'm worried I'll miss a deadline. Though it can feel like the end of the world when I'm struggling to get a story done, it's really not.

For fishermen, however, the littlest mistakes can be deadly. As our December issue's "Consequences" (page 14) demonstrates, you can pay the ultimate price for any unguarded moments at sea.

The story begins with a football game. Two Louisiana shrimpers had tied together on a Sunday night in December so their crews could watch football together. They also ran an overhead grab line between the boats so those crossing over could steady themselves.

consequencesAfter the skipper and crewman from the first boat crossed over to the second boat, the skipper decided to stay on deck a little longer. "When the crewman went back outside 15 to 20 minutes later, he didn't find the skipper. The crewman assumed the skipper returned to his boat via the grab line as he'd done many times."

But this time was different. When the crewman returned to the boat after the game, he couldn't find the skipper. He was never found despite an extensive search involving a Coast Guard helicopter and cutter and other nearby fishing vessels.

Safety is a big concern for our readers. A review of our most popular news stories from October shows commercial fishing continues to be a highly dangerous occupation. Among our most popular was a Bering Sea rescue caught on video, and stories about three men saved from the water as they were clinging to the bow of a sinking boat, and a survivor of a sinking who credits the crewman who didn't survive (also his father-in-law) for saving his life.

Knowing how important safety is to you, we include a safety column submitted by the U.S. Coast Guard in every issue of National Fisherman, recounting a disaster and lessons learned from it. As December's column shows, not every safety story is dramatic, but when you're at sea the results can be just as deadly. Fish safe!

USCG photo

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Page 4 of 11

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 7/17/14

In this episode, National Fisherman's Boats & Gear Editor Michael Crowley talks with Mike Hillers about the Simrad PX Multisensor.

 

National Fisherman Live: 7/8/14

In this episode:

  • Obama proposes initiative on tracking fish
  • Council retains haddock bycatch limit
  • Columbia River salmon plan challenged
  • Virginia approves reduction in blue crab harvest
  • Ala. shrimpers hope to net some jumbo profits

 

Inside the Industry

PORTLAND, Maine – The Maine Lobster Marketing Collaborative has appointed Matt Jacobson as its new executive director.
 
 Read more...

The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council will convene its Red Snapper Advisory Panel Wednesday, July 30, 2014, from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. at the council office — 2203 N. Lois Avenue, Suite 1100, in Tampa, Fla. 

Read more...

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