National Fisherman


SamHillSamuel Hill is associate editor for National Fisherman.



I've got two stories to share that somehow seem appropriate for a Friday afternoon. For the first, sometimes it's good to get a reminder about why certain things are important — even if that reminder is an unpleasant one. National Fisherman's editor Jes Hathaway is a huge advocate for eating wild U.S. fish. Here's a reminder why that U.S.A. label is important:

Asian Seafood Raised On Pig Feces Approved for U.S. Consumers

Gross. One of the problems is that when people read things like this they sometimes think all seafood is bad (people aren't stupid but they have a lot to think about) so the message should be clear and simple: U.S. wild.

Repeat as necessary: U.S. wild. U.S. wild.

This next story isn't as gross, I promise. You may have noticed the web is buzzing with reports of a huge, softball-sized eye that washed up on Pompano Beach in Southern Florida. There's speculation that it once belonged to a giant squid or possibly a very large swordfish. I'm thinking that if anyone knows what kind of creature it once belonged to it would be fishermen, our readers. So what do you think? Have you ever looked into this eyeball before?

I imagine it was a moment you'll never forget.

Inside the Industry

Pink shrimp is the first fishery managed by Washington to receive certification from the global Marine Stewardship Council fisheries standard for sustainable, wild-caught seafood.

The state’s fishery was independently assessed as a scope extension of the MSC certified Oregon pink shrimp fishery, which achieved certification to the MSC standard in December 2007 and attained recertification in February 2013.


NMFS has awarded 16 grants totaling more than $2.5 million as part of its Bycatch Reduction Engineering Program.

The program supports the development of technological solutions and changes in fishing practices designed to minimize bycatch and aims to to find creative approaches and strategies for reducing bycatch, seabird interactions, and post-release mortality in federally managed fisheries.

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