National Fisherman

Coastlines 

melissaMelissa Wood is associate editor for Professional BoatBuilder magazine and a former associate editor for National Fisherman.

 

 

 


Four Fish
The Future of the Last Wild Food
By Paul Greenberg
Penguin Press, 2010
Hardcover, 284 pp., $25.95
www.penguin.com
www.fourfish.org

Last call of the wild? Author spotlights species to study sustainability issue

If I feel like making haddock for dinner, I can stop at the grocery store or fish market on my way home from work and pick up a fillet. It’s a simple but also modern idea: The industrialization of agriculture allows us to take for granted that we can buy whatever food we want, whenever we want, as long as we have enough money to do so.

But how do you reconcile our expectations for fully stocked supermarket shelves with a wild resource like fish?

One answer is that you don’t, that you simply replace unpredictable wild stocks with farmed product. In the last 30 years, farmed seafood has nearly overtaken wild fish in consumption in the United States, United Kingdom and Canada, and it is a trend that continues. The National Fisheries Institute reported that farmed tilapia bumped Alaska pollock down a notch to become America’s fourth favorite fish in 2010.

Is this inevitable, asks Paul Greenberg in “Four Fish”: “Must we eliminate all wildness from the sea and replace it with some kind of human controlled system or can wilderness be understood and managed well enough to keep humanity and the marine world in balance?”

To answer this question, Greenberg examines the histories and current conditions of four species that dominate the modern fish counter — salmon, sea bass, cod and tuna. Greenberg, an avid fisherman and thorough reporter, offers thoughtful ideas about what we need to do to ensure that our grandchildren can taste a fish that has swum in the open sea. You may not agree with all of his conclusions, but I believe his investigation is worth reading. — Melissa Wood

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 3/10/15

In this episode, Online Editor Leslie Taylor talks with Mike McLouglin, vice president of Dunlop Industrial and Protective Footwear.

National Fisherman Live: 2/24/15

In this episode:

March date set for disaster aid dispersal
Oregon LNG project could disrupt fishing
NOAA tweaks gear marking requirement
N.C. launches first commercial/recreational dock
Spiny lobster traps limits not well received

Inside the Industry

SeaShare, a non-profit organization that facilitates donations of seafood to feed the hungry, announced on Wednesday, July 29 that it had partnered up with Alaska seafood companies, freight companies and the Coast Guard, to coordinate the donation and delivery of 21,000 pounds of halibut to remote villages in western Alaska. 

On Wednesday, the Coast Guard loaded 21,000 pounds of donated halibut on its C130 airplane in Kodiak and made the 634-mile flight to Nome.

Read more...

The New England Fishery Management Council  is soliciting applications for seats on the Northeast Trawl Survey Advisory Panel and the deadline to apply is July 31 at 5:00 p.m.

The panel will consist of 16 members including members of the councils and the Atlantic States Fishery Commission, industry experts, non-federal scientists and Northeast Fisheries Science Center scientists. Panel members are expected to serve for three years.

Read more...
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