National Fisherman

Boats & Gear 

Michael CrowleyThe Boats & Gear blog is overseen by our Boats & Gear editor, Michael Crowley. It explores new construction projects, electronics, gear and equipment for the commercial fishing industry.

2013 1212 NorthernIt definitely appeared unusual, if not strange. I’d been walking the aisles of Pacific Marine Expo searching for new ideas, different ways of approaching old problems.

Looking at the profile drawing on the wall of Northern Marine’s booth, I thought “OK. I haven’t seen that before on a fishing boat.” The artist’s rendering displayed a 58-foot seiner, but instead of sporting the normal cylindrical shaped bulbous bow that juts straight out from the hull’s forefoot, this bulb seemed kind of squished up, while pushing up from the forefoot to the waterline and not going out very far.

George Roddan, a Canadian architect, designed the hull (which packs 210,000 pounds below deck) and bulb using computational analysis. The bulb was designed to give the 58-footer a 10-knot speed. Early reports from the first 58-footer launched by Northern Marine put the speed at 10.8 knots, with a 750-hp Cummins QSK19.
BG 2013 1212 Thermashield
Don’t feel alone if you haven’t heard of Northern Marine. Located in Anacortes, Wash., Northern Marine is a newly created branch of New World Yacht Builders, and this is their first commercial fishing boat.

Also on the show floor, I’m always on the lookout for safety products, especially from outfits new to the show, which is what I found at the Nautilus Lifeline booth. As I remember, they had one product, a marine rescue radio with GPS.

The company started out selling the waterproof radios to divers and other recreational users before deciding to enter the commercial market. The small handheld radio seems simple to use. Flip up the top and push the red button to send a distress message and your GPS position. The green button lets you talk to your own boat — if, say, you are in a skiff or suddenly find yourself in the water. The orange button is for talking to other boats on channel 16.

If you do go in the water, it’s best to be in an immersion suit, and the Stearns booth displayed the Thermashield 24+, which pushes the design level for immersion suits up a notch or three.

The normal immersion suit in 32-degree water provides a roughly six-hour window of protection from hypothermia. As the name says, the Thermashield 24+ gives you at least 24 hours.

Here’s where Stearns is different from every other immersion suit. With the suit zipped up, you blow into a tube, and that transfers heat from your breath — about 88 degrees — into a series of air bladders within the suit. Basically you use your core body heat to warm the immersion suit and yourself.

Stearns’ new immersion suit also comes with hard-sole molded boots, making it easier to walk on deck than when wearing Gumby-style footwear.

There were other new products at the show, including an engine from GE that probably was the biggest that’s been at PME, but the three mentioned here were showstoppers for me.

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11.19.13 beergardenAll right! Listen up! For all you commercial fishermen and boat freaks in the Pacific Northwest who have been asleep for the past few months, I’m here to remind you it’s Pacific Marine Expo time at Seattle’s CenturyLink Field. The show starts Wednesday, Nov. 20 and runs for three days.

The show is loaded with new products and is the perfect place to see the latest fishing gear, electronics, clothing, engines — you name it. If it’s new, it will probably be there. And some of these companies don’t want to take home what they hauled to the show, so it can be a good place to make a deal. I’ve known of more than one fisherman who has outfitted a new boat pretty much from the stuff he’s been able to get at the show and didn’t pay top dollar.

On Thursday — if you like boats, and I have to assume you do — take a break from cruising the aisles and checkout Boatyard Day. That’s an area of the show floor where we will be talking about and showing slides of a number of the boats that have appeared in National Fishermen (as well as WorkBoat magazine) in the past year. There will be big boats, little boats, futuristic boats and fast boats — I’m talking close to 80 mph. That kind of fast.

At this point, I hope you haven’t spent all your money because every afternoon, there’s Happy Hour in the Beer Garden. Sit down, relax and have a cold one.  

See you there.

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2013 1031 PropRolls-Royce's new integrated prop and rudder retrofit package could cut the fuel bill for boats approaching factory-trawler size.

The first installation of Rolls-Royce’s Promas Lite on a commercial fishing vessel should be completed by the first of November at Vigor Shipyard in Seattle. The vessel is the 376-foot factory trawler Alaska Ocean owned by Seattle’s Glacier Fish.

There are three elements with a Promas Lite retrofit. A stainless steel hubcap goes over the propeller hub, while behind it is a prefabricated bulb that’s attached to the existing rudder. Then the propeller is either rebladed or replaced by one that allows maximum loading on the blade tips.

Put them all together and you have a streamlined waterflow across the rudder, as well as behind it. That results in increased propeller thrust, fuel reduction of 5 to 15 percent (It’s near the lower end of the scale when towing), and a reduction in emissions. It’s also possible that a reduced engine load will reduce the wear on the engine.

Promas Lite can go on single- and twin-screw vessels. While it has been installed on a number of cruise ships, this is the first commercial fishing vessel installation. The payback period should be two to three years.

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The Oct. 1 blog of my fellow editor, Jessica Hathaway, entitled “Better know a fisherman” was about the promotion of the fishing industry through a federal program — Seafood 101.

It made me think of an earlier seafood promotion campaign intent on reminding people that seafood was “Delicious, Nutritious, Healthful.” It was a time when there was a great deal of despair in the country. It was the Depression of the 1930s and the uncertainty swirling across the country was pulling families and businesses into its void.2013 1017 EatMoreFish

That included the fishing industry, which was in a “state of irresolution,” according to an editorial in the July 1932 edition of the Atlantic Fisherman. As a result, seafood was being undercut by the “decreased price of meats and other foods, which have attracted the public, always fickle and faddish in its tastes, away from it.”

Then the Linen Thread Co., which was involved with pretty much anything that had to do with thread — sewing thread, shoe threads, mattress twine, seine twine, tarred lines, nets, trawls — came up with an idea to end the “uncertainty and aimlessness.”

It was the “Eat More Fish” campaign. Initially it was directed at those within its own nationwide organization, telling its employees to eat more fish and to promote the idea to others.

Then the Linen Thread Co. started putting stickers on all their mail, both letters and packages. The three-color sticker measured 1 1/2 inches by 2 1/4 inches with the words “Eat More Fish — Delicious, Nutritious, Healthful.”

It wasn’t long after that the Linen Thread Co. started getting requests for the stickers in lots from 2,000 to 10,000. The stickers were 50 cents per thousand to produce, and the Linen Thread Co. sold them at cost. The stickers lacked advertising, so any company could use them.

In its editorial, Atlantic Fisherman saw the campaign as a confidence builder for the fishing industry that anyone could promote and at little expense.

Eighty-one years later the fishing industry and the country, while both have their problems, are in much better shape. Still, I wonder what would happen if a company like, say, Furuno, with business in both the recreation and commercial markets, put The Linen Thread Co. sticker on all its packages and letters? It wouldn’t hurt the fishermen, and I bet the company’s sales from the fishing industry would increase. Just a thought.

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Machinery-generated noise and vibration can be a real pain when you are on a boat. In the short term it, affects the amount of sleep you get, general level of irritability (that goes a long way in determining how well you get along with the crew) and how aware you are of what’s going on around you. That final component could turn into a safety issue.

In the long term, prolonged periods of noise and vibration causes loss of hearing and other physical ailments.

There are two types of noise — airborne and structural. In National Fisherman’s November issue, part of the Boats & Gear story on generators (“New generation,” p. 32) discusses these noises and focuses on an isolation mount from Christie & Grey, a noise, vibration and shock reduction outfit in Fairhaven, Mass.
2013 1001 Tyson
Vibration and engine noise have an adverse effect on fishermen, but fish also hear noise from approaching boats and appear to respond differently to quieter boats.

Between 2006 and 2008, NOAA matched up two of its fishery research boats, the Oscar Dyson and the Miller Freeman, for a simultaneous survey of walleye pollock in Alaska’s Bering Sea, Shumagin Islands and Shelikof Straits to see if the pollock reacted differently to the two boats.

The Oscar Dyson was commissioned in 2005 and was built with acoustic quieting technologies, including vibration mounts from Christie & Grey. The Miller Freeman was an earlier generation design without the acoustic quieting features.

In the eastern Bering Sea at depths less than 120 meters, both boats recorded statistically equivalent densities of pollock. It was the same at depths of 400 to 700 meters at Bogoslof, an island in the Bering Sea.

But around the Shumagin Islands and Shelikof Straits the results were different. In the Shumagin Islands at depths of 100 to 200 meters, pollock abundance counts for the Oscar Dyson were 31 percent higher than for the Miller Freeman and 13 percent higher at depths of 200 to 300 meters in the Shelikof Straits.

The differences were likely greater in shallower water because the fish were closer to the boats. In addition, there was a stronger diving response from the fish when the Miller Freeman was in the area.

This was the first demonstration that noise reduction equipment can reduce the likelihood of fish avoiding the boat. If investing in noise reduction equipment improves fish estimates, it would seem to follow that noise reduction could increase the amount of fish caught on commercial fishing boats.

Photo: NOAA's R/V Oscar Dyson at work; NOAA

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When most people think about the hazards of commercial fishing what comes to mind is going overboard, being nailed with a parted line, getting wrapped up in a winch, or going down with your boat.

That’s the gruesome, dramatic side of fishing, guaranteed to get some press attention. Fortunately, those types of injuries don't occur every day (though the threat looms). However, there’s a more persistent and painful side to this kind of work that is more apparent the longer you are in the game. The cause is mostly repetitive stresses to the lower back, shoulders, elbows, wrists and hands. If ignored they make fishing (and just getting around) uncomfortable at best.
2013 0926 AMSEA
“Strains, Sprains & Pains: Ergonomic Injury Prevention for Commercial Fishermen: A Pocket Guide to Ergonomics” from the Alaska Marine Safety Education Association can guide you through the basics of onboard ergonomics. Adapting your work area — deck, fish hold, hauling station, whatever — the equipment and how you fish to reduce those stresses can change the way you feel about your job.

The booklet explains how various postures and the forces they put on an individual — say, when hauling in a gillnet — can be stressful and what can be done to alleviate the situation. For instance, keep the load close to the body, and when pushing or pulling, have the load at mid-torso height.

Sometimes the tool needs to be altered. In a discussion on injuries to the wrists and hands, the organization recommends using a scraper with a built-in bend to minimize the twisting of the wrist, instead of using a fish scraper with a straight handle, which bends the wrist. Or use one with a hose fitting on the end.

That’s just a taste of the wide range of helpful hints in this informative booklet. Finding out more by contacting AMSEA at (907) 747-3287; www.amsea.org.

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2013 0903 EasyMoneyRaceOn August 18, 65 boats showed up in Portland for the last event on Maine’s lobster-boat racing circuit. Lobster boats came to race from as far away as Beals Island to the east and Hampton, N.H., to the west. Lining the racecourse were about another 150 spectator boats and hundreds of spectators looking out onto the course from Portland’s Eastern Promenade.

More was at stake here than just prizes and bragging rights. Since 2010 the Portland race has been part of a weekend fundraising effort for the Greater New England Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, thus the name: MS Harborfest Lobster Boat Races.
2013 0903 Fireboat
Besides the lobster boat races, there was a sailboat race, an auction and a tugboat race. All of them were part of the revenue stream that generated just over $100,000 for the weekend. The biggest part of that — about $46,000 — came from the auction. Tugboat operators made donations and kicked in money from the sale of merchandise. Sailboat operators got businesses and individuals to sponsor their boats.

The lobster-boat races kicked in just over $6,000. The money came from selling T-shirts and donating each boat’s $20 entry fee. In addition, many fishermen give up the prize money they won for first, second or third place, and if no boats showed up for a particular race, all the prize money for that race went to the multiple sclerosis fund.

2013 0903 TugMusterIn at least one case, a fisherman who wasn’t racing “came up and handed over a $100 bill,” says Jon Johansen, president of the Maine Lobster Boat Racing Association. “A lot of these people have been affected by MS, so they give.”


Top: Easy Money cruises to a finish in Portland Harbor; Portland fireboat starts the day's festivities; Harborfest closes with a tugboat muster and race; Photos by Jessica Hathaway

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I know, the photo with this blog looks like a rerun of the photo of Foolish Pleasure at the Moosabec Reach lobster boat races that ran with my last entry. However, this shot was taken at the Winter Harbor races on August 10 and shows why Galen Alley’s 30-foot Foolish Pleasure with 2,000-plus horsepower is, as more than one person has said, “an accident waiting to happen.”

BG 081513 WinterHarborRacetNotice that the keel doesn’t show up until you’re well behind what would be the hauling station if Foolish Pleasure were a working lobster boat, which it isn’t. Lacking any keel in the water through the fore part of the boat, Foolish Pleasure’s directional stability is limited, if there at all, when running into a good chop, swell, wind or even strong tides.

That’s when Foolish Pleasure can be beat in a race, which is what happened in the Gas Free for All at Winter Harbor. Shawn Alley in the 30-foot Little Girls beat Foolish Pleasure. Little Girls is a wooden lobster boat built by Beals Island’s Calvin Beal Jr. in 1981, though back then she was “Little Girl” — singular.

Little Girl’s first brush with notoriety was almost a tragedy when, at the 1981 Fourth of July races at Jonesport, a steering linkage broke and the Little Girl slammed into a piling supporting the Jonesport to Beals Island bridge that crosses Moosabec Reach.

On the stern was a toddler, Beal’s nephew, I think, who went over the transom and out of sight. Beal jumped into the water and after the longest time for those watching from shore, surfaced with the kid under one arm.

These days, Little Girls is powered by a big-block Ford, with just over 500 cubic inches and rumored to have slightly more than 700 horsepower. Normally that’s not enough to beat Foolish Pleasure, but for this race, sea conditions weren’t the best for Galen to run at full throttle, and near the finish line the engine “hiccupped,” says Jon Johansen, president of the Maine Lobster Boat Racing Association, “someone said a bungee cord let go and he had to come back on the engine, but just for a moment.” Still, it was enough for Little Girls to cross the line first.

(If the bungee cord tale is true, you have to wonder why someone spends well over $125,000 for an engine and to risk everything going to hell because of a $2 bungee cord.)

The Maine Lobster Boat Racing Association has had problems with its radar gun, but estimates put the Little Girls at 45 mph when she hit the finish line.

A bit of a sideshow at Winter Harbor was the lobster boat Going Deep with a hailing port of “Up Shit’s Creek Maine.”

The next day’s races at Pemaquid were different. Sea conditions allowed Galen and the Foolish Pleasure to go unchecked. “He could fly. He could give it to her and didn’t have to worry at all. The conditions were absolutely perfect, and he put on a show for the people,” says Johansen.

Again, the radar gun wasn’t working, so it’s hard to say for sure how fast Foolish Pleasure was going, but based on Foolish Pleasure’s GPS readings, it’s estimated she was running at about 80 mph.

This Sunday, August 18, the last race of the season is in Portland. Hopefully sea conditions will be flat calm with no wind, and Foolish Pleasure and all the other boats will cross the finish line without any mishaps or hiccups.

Photo: Jon Johansen

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Every lobsterman loves a good race. At least if the lobsterman is from Maine, which is why some have engines rated from 500 to 1,000 horsepower in boats ranging from 30 to 42 feet. You certainly don’t need that much horsepower to haul traps. Chalk it up to more than a smattering of — pleasurable and intense as it may be — irrationality, which is all part of Maine’s lobster boat racing season.

These are not fishermen with outfits like Caterpillar, Twin Disc and Cummins picking up the tab. These are guys that a day or two after a race have to go out and haul, and the day after that and the day after that. Blow a piston and your day job is shot. And you’ve got to spend money to fix the problem.

4-Moosebec-165But that’s being rational. Bank on it, lobstermen will show up for the race. When the flag drops they’ll slam the hammer down and head as hard down the course as their boat will go.

At this year’s Stonington races 92 boats competed, and 84 showed up at the Moosabec Reach races. The numbers dropped off after that, but you can bet that by the time the last race is held on Aug. 18 in Portland, several hundred boats will have run in this year’s races.

Fortunately, there haven’t been a lot of breakdowns. In It’s racing season, I mentioned that the 28-foot Wild, Wild West had a turbo failure with parts of the turbo ending up in the bilge at the Rockland races.
 
Turbo failures caused a couple of other boats to be towed from the course. The 37-foot Madison Alexa reached the finish line at Jonesport when people heard a pop followed by a lot of smoke. At Stonington, the same pop sounded from First Team and, “green stuff was running out of the motor,” says Jon Johansen, president of the Maine Lobster Boat Racing Association.

At Searsport, the 37-foot Miss Karlee broke a piston ring. She had to be hauled out of the water and up to Otis Enterprises Marine to have the engine torn apart.

The nearest miss involved Galen Alley’s Foolish Pleasure at the Moosabec Reach races. Foolish Pleasure is not a working lobster boat. The boat is built on a 30-foot lobster-boat hull but with an engine that’s over 2,000 horsepower and runs on something only the owner and the boat’s mechanic know. She’s got the speed record at 72.8 mph.

Foolish Pleasure was running well ahead of her competitors, probably over 65 mph, when she started porpoising. “That’s always been a problem with that boat,” says Johansen. “It can go so fast but unless the conditions are right, he has issues.”

Foolish Pleasure came down on its bow, and once that happened, “it just sucked in around,” Johansen says. The boat went over and, according to estimates, went sideways for at least three boat lengths. Alley was strapped in at the helm, or otherwise he probably would have gone overboard.

Does that mean that Alley and any of the others won’t be idling up to the starting line at the next race? Nope, they’ll be there. After all, every lobsterman loves a good race — at least if he’s from Maine.

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You'd be hard pressed to find a bigger commitment to commercial fishing safety than what is happening in Scotland.

In Scotland there are just over 5,000 commercial fishermen. Any of those that value their lives and don't want their skipper to have to deliver the message to the poor wife — "I'm so sorry. Young Breannan went over the side two days ago and never came back up." — can take advantage of a safety program that provides a free inflatable PFD.

safetyposterThe force behind the program is the Scottish Fishermen's Federation, and you don't have to be a member of that group to get a free PFD. The PFD, says Derek Cardno, the project leader for the initiative, is the Compact 150 PFD. It was developed over a two-year period by a group of fishermen and Mullion, an outfit that specializes in flotation garments and life jackets in Scunthorpe, England.

"It has been tested and tried on every fishing sector in the UK with great success and good feedback," Cardno says.

The Scottish Fishermen's Federation purchased 5,000 PFDs and so far 800 fishermen have applied for their free PFD. Of course, nothing is free, so where did the money come from. The Scottish Fishermen's Federation is kicking in £130,000 British pounds ($198,666) via the Scottish Fishermen's Trust, £10,000 ($15,282) comes from the UK Fisheries Offshore Oil & Gas Trust, and £306,604 ($486,554) is from the European Fisheries Fund.

The only stipulations require that the boat the fisherman is on has a fishing license administrated by the Scottish government and the fisherman has a safety certificate.

U.S. fishermen seem somewhat reluctant to wear PFDs, but Cardo says, "On walking the quayside having discussions with fishermen, the feedback has been very positive because the Compact 150 has been designed by fishermen for fishermen. Fishermen when challenged with the product are finding it hard to come up with a good reason not to wear it."

For further information, contact Derek Cardno: Tel. 01224 646944, D.Cardno@sff.co.uk; www.sff.co.uk.

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Page 4 of 7

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 9/9/14

In this episode:

Seafood Watch upgrades status of 21 fish species
Calif. bill attacking seafood mislabeling approved
Ballot item would protect Bristol Bay salmon
NOAA closes cod, yellowtail fishing areas
Pacific panel halves young bluefin harvest

National Fisherman Live: 8/26/14

In this episode, National Fisherman Publisher Jerry Fraser talks about his early days dragging for redfish on the Vandal.

Inside the Industry

More than a dozen higher education institutions and federal and local fishery management agencies and organizations in American Samoa, Guam, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and Hawaii have signed a memorandum of understanding aimed at building the capacity of the U.S. Pacific Island territories to manage their fisheries and fishery-related resources.

Read more...

PORTLAND, Maine – The Maine Lobster Marketing Collaborative has appointed Matt Jacobson as its new executive director.
 
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